Bleeding out the quality-adjusted life years: Evaluating the burden of primary dysmenorrhea using time trade-off and willingness-to-pay methods

Fanni Rencz, Márta Péntek, Peep F.M. Stalmeier, Valentin Brodszky, Gábor Ruzsa, Edina Gradvohl, Petra Baji, L. Gulácsi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Primary dysmenorrhea (PD), or painful menstruation in the absence of identified uterine pathology, affects 5 to 9 in every 10 reproductive-aged women. Despite its high prevalence, just a few studies with very small patient numbers have focused on health-related quality of life impairment in PD. We aimed to assess health-related quality of life values for a severe and a mild hypothetical PD health state using 10-year time trade-off and willingness-to-pay methods. In 2015, a nationwide convenience sample of women, aged between 18 and 40 years, was recruited using an Internet-based cross-sectional survey in Hungary. Respondents with a known history of secondary dysmenorrhea were excluded. Data on 1836 and 160 women, with and without a history of PD, respectively, were analysed. Mean utility values for the severe and mild health states were 0.85 (median 0.95) and 0.94 (median 1), respectively. Participants were willing to pay a mean of €1127 (median €161) and €142 (median €16) for a complete cure from the severe and mild PD health states. Compared with the non-PD group, women with PD valued both health states worse according to willingness to pay (P < 0.05) but similar in the time trade-off. It seems that PD substantially contributes to the quality-adjusted life year loss in this age group, which is comparable with losses from chronic diseases such as type 1 diabetes, asthma, atopic eczema, or chronic migraine. Our findings provide a useful input to cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analyses of PD treatments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2259-2267
Number of pages9
JournalPain
Volume158
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

Dysmenorrhea
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Hemorrhage
Health
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Quality of Life
Hungary
Atopic Dermatitis
Migraine Disorders
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Internet
Chronic Disease
Asthma
Age Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies
Pathology

Keywords

  • Health-related quality of life
  • Pain
  • Primary dysmenorrhea
  • Time trade-off
  • Utility values
  • Willingness to pay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Bleeding out the quality-adjusted life years : Evaluating the burden of primary dysmenorrhea using time trade-off and willingness-to-pay methods. / Rencz, Fanni; Péntek, Márta; Stalmeier, Peep F.M.; Brodszky, Valentin; Ruzsa, Gábor; Gradvohl, Edina; Baji, Petra; Gulácsi, L.

In: Pain, Vol. 158, No. 11, 01.11.2017, p. 2259-2267.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rencz, Fanni ; Péntek, Márta ; Stalmeier, Peep F.M. ; Brodszky, Valentin ; Ruzsa, Gábor ; Gradvohl, Edina ; Baji, Petra ; Gulácsi, L. / Bleeding out the quality-adjusted life years : Evaluating the burden of primary dysmenorrhea using time trade-off and willingness-to-pay methods. In: Pain. 2017 ; Vol. 158, No. 11. pp. 2259-2267.
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