Biogeographical estimates of allergenic pollen transport over regional scales: Common ragweed and Szeged, Hungary as a test case

László Makra, István Matyasovszky, Gábor Tusnády, Yaqiang Wang, Zoltán Csépe, Zoltán Bozóki, László G. Nyúl, János Erostyák, Károly Bodnár, Zoltán Sümeghy, Heike Vogel, Andreas Pauling, Anna Páldy, Donát Magyar, Gergely Mányoki, Karl Christian Bergmann, Maira Bonini, Branko Šikoparija, Predrag Radišić, Regula GehrigAndreja Kofol Seliger, Barbara Stjepanović, Victoria Rodinkova, Alexander Prikhodko, Anna Maleeva, Elena Severova, Jana Ščevková, Nicoleta Ianovici, Renata Peternel, Michel Thibaudon

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16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long-distance pollen transport can substantially raise local pollen levels, but their relative contribution has not yet been quantified temporally or spatially in ragweed infested regions. Using common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen accumulation at a ragweed infested area, Szeged, Hungary as a test case, this study attempted to: (1) identify, using cluster analysis, biogeographical regions that contribute to long-range transport of ragweed pollen to Szeged; (2) quantify the relative contribution of ragweed pollen from these regions; (3) determine the relative contribution of "local" and "transported" pollen for Szeged. Using the HYSPLIT model, three-dimensional backward trajectories were produced daily over a 5-year period, 2009-2013 for ragweed pollen accumulation at Szeged. A k-means clustering algorithm using the Mahalanobis distance was applied in order to develop trajectory types. Nine back-trajectory clusters were identified. Cluster 1 (direction: from the Channel area south of Great Britain) and cluster 5 (direction: from Northern Mediterranean) were found the most relevant potential long-distance sources for Ambrosia pollen transport to Szeged. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) and concentration weighted trajectory (CWT) values indicated additional potential source areas including the central and eastern part of France, the northern part of Italy and the Carpathian Basin. For Szeged on non-rainy days, medium-range transport is important, while on rainy days the two transport ranges have equal weights. Based on the Granger causality, annual pollen amount transported by the atmospheric circulation is 27.8% of the annual total pollen at Szeged. From this quantity, 7.5% is added to (due to transport), while 20.3% is subtracted from (e.g. because of wash-out by frontal rainfalls going towards Szeged) local sources.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)94-110
Number of pages17
JournalAgricultural and Forest Meteorology
Volume221
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2016

Keywords

  • Ambrosia pollen transport
  • Backward trajectories
  • Cluster analysis
  • Mahalanobis distance
  • Separation of medium- and long-range transport

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry
  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Atmospheric Science

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    Makra, L., Matyasovszky, I., Tusnády, G., Wang, Y., Csépe, Z., Bozóki, Z., Nyúl, L. G., Erostyák, J., Bodnár, K., Sümeghy, Z., Vogel, H., Pauling, A., Páldy, A., Magyar, D., Mányoki, G., Bergmann, K. C., Bonini, M., Šikoparija, B., Radišić, P., ... Thibaudon, M. (2016). Biogeographical estimates of allergenic pollen transport over regional scales: Common ragweed and Szeged, Hungary as a test case. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 221, 94-110. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agrformet.2016.02.006