Big thoughts in small brains? Dogs as a model for understanding human social cognition

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this review we argued that dogs can provide a good model for both the evolution of human social-cognitive abilities and studying the underlying neural and genetic structures of these behavioural features. The key difference between the present and other approaches for modelling human social evolution lies in the assumption that there is a large overlap between the human and dog behaviour complex because during their evolution in close contact with human groups dogs evolved functionally similar social skills. Thus the parallel investigation of the human and dog behaviour complex widens our possibility for understanding human social cognition because it allows the modelling of the interaction between various components in contrast to other models which are often restricted to modelling a single aspect of human social cognitive skills.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)467-471
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroReport
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2007

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Cognition
Dogs
Brain
Genetic Structures
Social Skills

Keywords

  • Animal cognition
  • Animal models
  • Attachment
  • Behavioural evolution
  • Communication
  • Dog
  • Social cognition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Big thoughts in small brains? Dogs as a model for understanding human social cognition. / Miklósi, A.; Topál, J.; Csányi, V.

In: NeuroReport, Vol. 18, No. 5, 03.2007, p. 467-471.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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