Being macrosomic at birth is an independent predictor of overweight in children

Results from the IDEFICS study

Sonia Sparano, Wolfgang Ahrens, Stefaan De Henauw, Staffan Marild, D. Molnár, Luis A. Moreno, Marc Suling, Michael Tornaritis, Toomas Veidebaum, Alfonso Siani, Paola Russo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fetal macrosomia is a risk factor for the development of obesity late in childhood. We retrospectively evaluated the relationship between maternal conditions associated with fetal macrosomia and actual overweight/obesity in the European cohort of children participating in the IDEFICS study. Anthropometric variables, blood pressure and plasma lipids and glucose were measured. Socio-demographic data, medical history and perinatal factors, familiar and gestational history, maternal and/or gestational diabetes were assessed by a questionnaire. Variables of interest were reported for 10,468 children (M/F = 5,294/5,174; age 6.0 ± 1.8 years, M ± SD). The sample was divided in four groups according to child birth weight (BW) and maternal diabetes: (1) adequate for gestational age offspring (BW between the 10th and 90th percentiles for gestational age) of mothers without diabetes (AGA-ND); (2) adequate for gestational age offspring of mothers with diabetes (AGA-D); (3) macrosomic offspring (BW > 90th percentile for gestational age) of mothers without diabetes (Macro-ND); (4) macrosomic offspring of mothers with diabetes (Macro-D). Children macrosomic at birth showed significantly higher actual values of body mass index, waist circumference, and sum of skinfold thickness. In both boys and girls, Macro-ND was an independent determinant of overweight/obesity, after the adjustment for confounders [Boys: OR = 1.7 95 % CI (1.3;2.2); Girls: OR = 1.6 95 % CI (1.3;2.0)], while Macro-D showed a significant association only in girls [OR = 2.6 95 % CI (1.1;6.4)]. Fetal macrosomia, also in the absence of maternal/gestational diabetes, is independently associated with the development of overweight/obesity during childhood. Improving the understanding of fetal programming will contribute to the early prevention of childhood overweight/obesity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1373-1381
Number of pages9
JournalMaternal and Child Health Journal
Volume17
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Fetal Macrosomia
Surrogate Mothers
Mothers
Gestational Age
Parturition
Pediatric Obesity
Birth Weight
Gestational Diabetes
Obesity
Skinfold Thickness
Waist Circumference
Fetal Development
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Body Mass Index
History
Demography
Blood Pressure
Lipids
Glucose

Keywords

  • Childhood obesity
  • Fetal macrosomia
  • Gestational diabetes
  • Gestational weight gain
  • IDEFICS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Being macrosomic at birth is an independent predictor of overweight in children : Results from the IDEFICS study. / Sparano, Sonia; Ahrens, Wolfgang; De Henauw, Stefaan; Marild, Staffan; Molnár, D.; Moreno, Luis A.; Suling, Marc; Tornaritis, Michael; Veidebaum, Toomas; Siani, Alfonso; Russo, Paola.

In: Maternal and Child Health Journal, Vol. 17, No. 8, 2013, p. 1373-1381.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sparano, S, Ahrens, W, De Henauw, S, Marild, S, Molnár, D, Moreno, LA, Suling, M, Tornaritis, M, Veidebaum, T, Siani, A & Russo, P 2013, 'Being macrosomic at birth is an independent predictor of overweight in children: Results from the IDEFICS study', Maternal and Child Health Journal, vol. 17, no. 8, pp. 1373-1381. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-012-1136-2
Sparano, Sonia ; Ahrens, Wolfgang ; De Henauw, Stefaan ; Marild, Staffan ; Molnár, D. ; Moreno, Luis A. ; Suling, Marc ; Tornaritis, Michael ; Veidebaum, Toomas ; Siani, Alfonso ; Russo, Paola. / Being macrosomic at birth is an independent predictor of overweight in children : Results from the IDEFICS study. In: Maternal and Child Health Journal. 2013 ; Vol. 17, No. 8. pp. 1373-1381.
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