Bedside placement of peritoneal dialysis catheters - a single-center experience from Hungary

Ákos Pethő, Réka P. Szabó, Mihály Tapolyai, L. Rosivall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: The successful implantation of peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters is a critical skill procedure with the potential to impact both the short- and long-term success of renal replacement therapy and the patients' survival. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed our single-center experience with nephrologist-placed minimally invasive, double-cuffed PD catheters (PDCs). Results: The recruitment period was March 2014 through December 2015. The follow-up period lasted until 2016. The mean age of the subjects was 60 ± 18 years and indications for the PD were diuretic resistant acutely decompensated chronic heart failure in seven patients (47%) and end-stage renal disease in eight (53%) patients. Comorbid conditions included diabetes (27%), ischemic heart disease (47%), advanced liver failure (27%), and a history of hypertension (73%). The cohort had a high mortality with five subjects only in severe heart failure group (33%) passing away during the index hospitalization; of the rest, two (13%) had heart transplantation, three (20%) changed modality to hemodialysis, and only five (33%) continued with maintenance PD beyond 1 month. Acute technical complications within the first month were infrequent: one catheter (6%) had drainage problems and one (6%) was lost due to extrusion. There were no serious complications (e.g., organ damage, peritonitis, etc.). Conclusions: In selected cases, particularly in severe diuretic refractory heart failure, PDC placement placed by a nephrologist is feasible with a low rate of complications even in a low-volume center setting. The catheters we placed were all functioning with only minor complications and PD could be started immediately.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)434-438
Number of pages5
JournalRenal failure
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2019

Fingerprint

Hungary
Peritoneal Dialysis
Catheters
Heart Failure
Diuretics
Renal Replacement Therapy
Liver Failure
Heart Transplantation
Peritonitis
Chronic Kidney Failure
Myocardial Ischemia
Renal Dialysis
Drainage
Hospitalization
Maintenance
Hypertension
Survival
Mortality
Nephrologists

Keywords

  • Heart failure
  • minimally invasive
  • PD catheter
  • percutaneous
  • peritoneal dialysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Nephrology

Cite this

Bedside placement of peritoneal dialysis catheters - a single-center experience from Hungary. / Pethő, Ákos; Szabó, Réka P.; Tapolyai, Mihály; Rosivall, L.

In: Renal failure, Vol. 41, No. 1, 01.11.2019, p. 434-438.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pethő, Ákos ; Szabó, Réka P. ; Tapolyai, Mihály ; Rosivall, L. / Bedside placement of peritoneal dialysis catheters - a single-center experience from Hungary. In: Renal failure. 2019 ; Vol. 41, No. 1. pp. 434-438.
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