Axotomy induces contrasting changes in calcium and calcium-binding proteins in oculomotor and hypoglossal nuclei of balb/c mice

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Abstract

Motor neurons with different susceptibility to degeneration have been identified in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Increase of intracellular calcium has been proposed as a mediator, amplifying the damage through a positive feedback of the known pathological processes. Accordingly, the potential of motor neurons to limit calcium increases during injury might be proportional to their viability. A basic mechanism of reducing calcium amplitudes depends on the calcium-buffering capacity, determined by the calcium-binding protein content. In this study, oculomotor and hypoglossal neurons, prototypes of resistant and vulnerable motor neurons in ALS were examined in axotomy experiments. Total calcium-, parvalbumin-, and calbindin-D28k levels of motor neurons of adult mice were characterized by electron microscopic histochemistry and light microscopic immunostaining. In hypoglossal neurons, compared with oculomotor neurons, larger and more enduring increases of calcium were detected. The perikarya of hypoglossal neurons remained immunonegative for both parvalbumin and calbindin-D28k. Qualitatively, no major cell loss was noted after axotomy, but a decreased neuronal marker staining at days 1-14 suggested a reversible injury of hypoglossal neurons. Oculomotor neurons were not stained for calbindin-D28k but stained for parvalbumin in control conditions, staining which increased at postoperative days 7-14 before returning to baseline. Neuronal marker staining did not change in these cells during the observed period. The higher level of parvalbumin in resistant motor neurons and their ability to up-regulate parvalbumin after injury, paralleled by a smaller increase of intracellular calcium suggest that parvalbumin may have a protective effect in these cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-32
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Comparative Neurology
Volume499
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2006

Fingerprint

Axotomy
Calcium-Binding Proteins
Parvalbumins
Motor Neurons
Calcium
Calbindin 1
Neurons
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Staining and Labeling
Wounds and Injuries
Pathologic Processes
Oculomotor Nuclear Complex
Up-Regulation
Electrons
Light

Keywords

  • Axotomy
  • Calcium
  • Calcium-binding proteins
  • Motor neurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

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title = "Axotomy induces contrasting changes in calcium and calcium-binding proteins in oculomotor and hypoglossal nuclei of balb/c mice",
abstract = "Motor neurons with different susceptibility to degeneration have been identified in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Increase of intracellular calcium has been proposed as a mediator, amplifying the damage through a positive feedback of the known pathological processes. Accordingly, the potential of motor neurons to limit calcium increases during injury might be proportional to their viability. A basic mechanism of reducing calcium amplitudes depends on the calcium-buffering capacity, determined by the calcium-binding protein content. In this study, oculomotor and hypoglossal neurons, prototypes of resistant and vulnerable motor neurons in ALS were examined in axotomy experiments. Total calcium-, parvalbumin-, and calbindin-D28k levels of motor neurons of adult mice were characterized by electron microscopic histochemistry and light microscopic immunostaining. In hypoglossal neurons, compared with oculomotor neurons, larger and more enduring increases of calcium were detected. The perikarya of hypoglossal neurons remained immunonegative for both parvalbumin and calbindin-D28k. Qualitatively, no major cell loss was noted after axotomy, but a decreased neuronal marker staining at days 1-14 suggested a reversible injury of hypoglossal neurons. Oculomotor neurons were not stained for calbindin-D28k but stained for parvalbumin in control conditions, staining which increased at postoperative days 7-14 before returning to baseline. Neuronal marker staining did not change in these cells during the observed period. The higher level of parvalbumin in resistant motor neurons and their ability to up-regulate parvalbumin after injury, paralleled by a smaller increase of intracellular calcium suggest that parvalbumin may have a protective effect in these cells.",
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T1 - Axotomy induces contrasting changes in calcium and calcium-binding proteins in oculomotor and hypoglossal nuclei of balb/c mice

AU - Obál, Izabella

AU - Engelhardt, József I.

AU - Siklós, László

PY - 2006/11/1

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N2 - Motor neurons with different susceptibility to degeneration have been identified in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Increase of intracellular calcium has been proposed as a mediator, amplifying the damage through a positive feedback of the known pathological processes. Accordingly, the potential of motor neurons to limit calcium increases during injury might be proportional to their viability. A basic mechanism of reducing calcium amplitudes depends on the calcium-buffering capacity, determined by the calcium-binding protein content. In this study, oculomotor and hypoglossal neurons, prototypes of resistant and vulnerable motor neurons in ALS were examined in axotomy experiments. Total calcium-, parvalbumin-, and calbindin-D28k levels of motor neurons of adult mice were characterized by electron microscopic histochemistry and light microscopic immunostaining. In hypoglossal neurons, compared with oculomotor neurons, larger and more enduring increases of calcium were detected. The perikarya of hypoglossal neurons remained immunonegative for both parvalbumin and calbindin-D28k. Qualitatively, no major cell loss was noted after axotomy, but a decreased neuronal marker staining at days 1-14 suggested a reversible injury of hypoglossal neurons. Oculomotor neurons were not stained for calbindin-D28k but stained for parvalbumin in control conditions, staining which increased at postoperative days 7-14 before returning to baseline. Neuronal marker staining did not change in these cells during the observed period. The higher level of parvalbumin in resistant motor neurons and their ability to up-regulate parvalbumin after injury, paralleled by a smaller increase of intracellular calcium suggest that parvalbumin may have a protective effect in these cells.

AB - Motor neurons with different susceptibility to degeneration have been identified in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Increase of intracellular calcium has been proposed as a mediator, amplifying the damage through a positive feedback of the known pathological processes. Accordingly, the potential of motor neurons to limit calcium increases during injury might be proportional to their viability. A basic mechanism of reducing calcium amplitudes depends on the calcium-buffering capacity, determined by the calcium-binding protein content. In this study, oculomotor and hypoglossal neurons, prototypes of resistant and vulnerable motor neurons in ALS were examined in axotomy experiments. Total calcium-, parvalbumin-, and calbindin-D28k levels of motor neurons of adult mice were characterized by electron microscopic histochemistry and light microscopic immunostaining. In hypoglossal neurons, compared with oculomotor neurons, larger and more enduring increases of calcium were detected. The perikarya of hypoglossal neurons remained immunonegative for both parvalbumin and calbindin-D28k. Qualitatively, no major cell loss was noted after axotomy, but a decreased neuronal marker staining at days 1-14 suggested a reversible injury of hypoglossal neurons. Oculomotor neurons were not stained for calbindin-D28k but stained for parvalbumin in control conditions, staining which increased at postoperative days 7-14 before returning to baseline. Neuronal marker staining did not change in these cells during the observed period. The higher level of parvalbumin in resistant motor neurons and their ability to up-regulate parvalbumin after injury, paralleled by a smaller increase of intracellular calcium suggest that parvalbumin may have a protective effect in these cells.

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