Avian brood parasitism and ectoparasite richness-scale-dependent diversity interactions in a three-level host-parasite system

Zoltán Vas, Tibor I. Fuisz, Péter Fehérvári, J. Reiczigel, L. Rózsa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Brood parasitic birds, their foster species and their ectoparasites form a complex coevolving system composed of three hierarchical levels. However, effects of hosts' brood parasitic life-style on the evolution of their louse (Phthiraptera: Amblycera, Ischnocera) lineages have never been tested. We present two phylogenetic analyses of ectoparasite richness of brood parasitic clades. Our hypothesis was that brood parasitic life-style affects louse richness negatively across all avian clades due to the lack of vertical transmission routes. Then, narrowing our scope to brood parasitic cuckoos, we explored macroevolutionary factors responsible for the variability of their louse richness. Our results show that taxonomic richness of lice is lower on brood parasitic clades than on their nonparasitic sister clades. However, we found a positive covariation between the richness of cuckoos' Ischnoceran lice and the number of their foster species, possibly due to the complex and dynamic subpopulation structure of cuckoo species that utilize several host species. We documented diversity interactions across a three-level host parasite system and we found evidence that brood parasitism has opposing effects on louse richness at two slightly differing macroevolutionary scales, namely the species richness and the genera richness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)959-968
Number of pages10
JournalEvolution
Volume67
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

Fingerprint

Phthiraptera
brood parasitism
louse
ectoparasite
lice
ectoparasites
parasite
Parasites
parasites
Cuculidae
lifestyle
Amblycera
Ischnocera
Life Style
Psocodea
vertical transmission
subpopulation
Birds
species richness
Siblings

Keywords

  • Host-parasite evolution
  • Independent contrasts
  • Macroevolution
  • Parasite transmission
  • Parasitism
  • Phthiraptera

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics

Cite this

Avian brood parasitism and ectoparasite richness-scale-dependent diversity interactions in a three-level host-parasite system. / Vas, Zoltán; Fuisz, Tibor I.; Fehérvári, Péter; Reiczigel, J.; Rózsa, L.

In: Evolution, Vol. 67, No. 4, 04.2013, p. 959-968.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5dcd0a14df4b4562a89a53b10e5c6a6d,
title = "Avian brood parasitism and ectoparasite richness-scale-dependent diversity interactions in a three-level host-parasite system",
abstract = "Brood parasitic birds, their foster species and their ectoparasites form a complex coevolving system composed of three hierarchical levels. However, effects of hosts' brood parasitic life-style on the evolution of their louse (Phthiraptera: Amblycera, Ischnocera) lineages have never been tested. We present two phylogenetic analyses of ectoparasite richness of brood parasitic clades. Our hypothesis was that brood parasitic life-style affects louse richness negatively across all avian clades due to the lack of vertical transmission routes. Then, narrowing our scope to brood parasitic cuckoos, we explored macroevolutionary factors responsible for the variability of their louse richness. Our results show that taxonomic richness of lice is lower on brood parasitic clades than on their nonparasitic sister clades. However, we found a positive covariation between the richness of cuckoos' Ischnoceran lice and the number of their foster species, possibly due to the complex and dynamic subpopulation structure of cuckoo species that utilize several host species. We documented diversity interactions across a three-level host parasite system and we found evidence that brood parasitism has opposing effects on louse richness at two slightly differing macroevolutionary scales, namely the species richness and the genera richness.",
keywords = "Host-parasite evolution, Independent contrasts, Macroevolution, Parasite transmission, Parasitism, Phthiraptera",
author = "Zolt{\'a}n Vas and Fuisz, {Tibor I.} and P{\'e}ter Feh{\'e}rv{\'a}ri and J. Reiczigel and L. R{\'o}zsa",
year = "2013",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01837.x",
language = "English",
volume = "67",
pages = "959--968",
journal = "Evolution; international journal of organic evolution",
issn = "0014-3820",
publisher = "Society for the Study of Evolution",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Avian brood parasitism and ectoparasite richness-scale-dependent diversity interactions in a three-level host-parasite system

AU - Vas, Zoltán

AU - Fuisz, Tibor I.

AU - Fehérvári, Péter

AU - Reiczigel, J.

AU - Rózsa, L.

PY - 2013/4

Y1 - 2013/4

N2 - Brood parasitic birds, their foster species and their ectoparasites form a complex coevolving system composed of three hierarchical levels. However, effects of hosts' brood parasitic life-style on the evolution of their louse (Phthiraptera: Amblycera, Ischnocera) lineages have never been tested. We present two phylogenetic analyses of ectoparasite richness of brood parasitic clades. Our hypothesis was that brood parasitic life-style affects louse richness negatively across all avian clades due to the lack of vertical transmission routes. Then, narrowing our scope to brood parasitic cuckoos, we explored macroevolutionary factors responsible for the variability of their louse richness. Our results show that taxonomic richness of lice is lower on brood parasitic clades than on their nonparasitic sister clades. However, we found a positive covariation between the richness of cuckoos' Ischnoceran lice and the number of their foster species, possibly due to the complex and dynamic subpopulation structure of cuckoo species that utilize several host species. We documented diversity interactions across a three-level host parasite system and we found evidence that brood parasitism has opposing effects on louse richness at two slightly differing macroevolutionary scales, namely the species richness and the genera richness.

AB - Brood parasitic birds, their foster species and their ectoparasites form a complex coevolving system composed of three hierarchical levels. However, effects of hosts' brood parasitic life-style on the evolution of their louse (Phthiraptera: Amblycera, Ischnocera) lineages have never been tested. We present two phylogenetic analyses of ectoparasite richness of brood parasitic clades. Our hypothesis was that brood parasitic life-style affects louse richness negatively across all avian clades due to the lack of vertical transmission routes. Then, narrowing our scope to brood parasitic cuckoos, we explored macroevolutionary factors responsible for the variability of their louse richness. Our results show that taxonomic richness of lice is lower on brood parasitic clades than on their nonparasitic sister clades. However, we found a positive covariation between the richness of cuckoos' Ischnoceran lice and the number of their foster species, possibly due to the complex and dynamic subpopulation structure of cuckoo species that utilize several host species. We documented diversity interactions across a three-level host parasite system and we found evidence that brood parasitism has opposing effects on louse richness at two slightly differing macroevolutionary scales, namely the species richness and the genera richness.

KW - Host-parasite evolution

KW - Independent contrasts

KW - Macroevolution

KW - Parasite transmission

KW - Parasitism

KW - Phthiraptera

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84875814558&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84875814558&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01837.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01837.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 23550748

AN - SCOPUS:84875814558

VL - 67

SP - 959

EP - 968

JO - Evolution; international journal of organic evolution

JF - Evolution; international journal of organic evolution

SN - 0014-3820

IS - 4

ER -