Autophagy in neuronal cell loss

A road to death

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The regulation of ageing has been extensively studied in divergent animal model systems including worms, flies and mice. However, little is known about the cellular pathways that mediate the death of these organisms. Analysing major cellular changes in the ageing nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has revealed a gradual, progressive deterioration of different tissues except for the nervous system, which remarkably preserves its integrity even in advanced old age. In addition, genetic data have shown that, in C. elegans and in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, lifespan is controlled by signals derived from neurons and acting throughout adulthood. Organismal death thus seems to be a consequence of the decline of specific neurons. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that late onset of neuronal cell loss generally occurs via autophagy, a process in which eukaryotic cells self-digest parts of their contents during development or to survive starvation. Here we suggest that overactivation of autophagy in the cells of the nervous system is the eventual cause of "physiological" death.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1126-1131
Number of pages6
JournalBioEssays
Volume28
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2006

Fingerprint

autophagy
Autophagy
Caenorhabditis elegans
Neurology
Diptera
Nervous System
Neurons
roads
Aging of materials
neurons
death
nervous system
Eukaryotic Cells
Fruits
Starvation
Drosophila melanogaster
Deterioration
Cause of Death
Fruit
Animals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Developmental Biology
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Autophagy in neuronal cell loss : A road to death. / Takács-Vellai, K.; Bayci, Andrew; Vellai, T.

In: BioEssays, Vol. 28, No. 11, 11.2006, p. 1126-1131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takács-Vellai, K. ; Bayci, Andrew ; Vellai, T. / Autophagy in neuronal cell loss : A road to death. In: BioEssays. 2006 ; Vol. 28, No. 11. pp. 1126-1131.
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