Autonomic nerves terminating on microvessels in the pineal organs of various submammalian vertebrates

C. L. Frank, Szabina J. Czirok, Csilla Vincze, G. Rácz, A. Szél, B. Vígh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In earlier works we have found that in the mammalian pineal organ, a part of autonomic nerves - generally thought to mediate light information from the retina - form vasomotor endings on smooth muscle cells of vessels. We supposed that they serve the vascular support for circadian and circannual periodic changes in the metabolic activity of the pineal tissue. In the present work, we investigated whether peripheral nerves present in the photoreceptive pineal organs of submammalians form similar terminals on microvessels. In the cyclostome, fish, amphibian, reptile and bird species investigated, autonomic nerves accompany vessels entering the arachnoidal capsule and interfollicular meningeal septa of the pineal organ. The autonomic nerves do not enter the pineal tissue proper but remain in the perivasal meningeal septa isolated by basal lamina. They are composed of unmyelinated and myelinated fibers and form terminals around arterioles, veins and capillaries. The terminals contain synaptic and granular vesicles. Comparing various vertebrates, more perivasal terminals were found in reptiles and birds than in the cyclostome, fish and amphibian pineal organs. Earlier, autonomic nerves of the pineal organs were predominantly investigated in connection with the innervation of pineal tissue. The perivasal terminals found in various submammalians show that a part of the pineal autonomic fibers are vasomotoric in nature, but the vasosensor function of some fibers cannot be excluded. We suppose that the vasomotor regulation of the pineal microvessels in the photosensory submamalian pineal - like in mammals - may serve the vascular support for circadian and circannual periodic changes in the metabolic activity of the pineal tissue. The higher number of perivasal terminals in reptiles and birds may correspond to the higher metabolic activity of the tissues in more differentiated species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-41
Number of pages7
JournalActa Biologica Hungarica
Volume56
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Autonomic Pathways
Microvessels
Vertebrates
nerve tissue
vertebrate
vertebrates
Reptiles
Tissue
Birds
reptile
reptiles
Amphibians
blood vessels
amphibian
Fish
Blood Vessels
amphibians
Fibers
birds
Fishes

Keywords

  • Amphybia
  • Cyclostome
  • Fine structure
  • Fish
  • Pineal organ
  • Reptiles birds
  • Vasomotor nerves

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Autonomic nerves terminating on microvessels in the pineal organs of various submammalian vertebrates. / Frank, C. L.; Czirok, Szabina J.; Vincze, Csilla; Rácz, G.; Szél, A.; Vígh, B.

In: Acta Biologica Hungarica, Vol. 56, No. 1-2, 2005, p. 35-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Frank, C. L. ; Czirok, Szabina J. ; Vincze, Csilla ; Rácz, G. ; Szél, A. ; Vígh, B. / Autonomic nerves terminating on microvessels in the pineal organs of various submammalian vertebrates. In: Acta Biologica Hungarica. 2005 ; Vol. 56, No. 1-2. pp. 35-41.
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