Autologous osteochondral grafting (mosaic arthroplasty) for treatment of subchondral cystic lesions in the equine stifle and fetlock joints

Gabor Bodo, L. Hangody, Laszlo Modis, Mark Hurtig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To describe treatment of equine subchondral bone cysts (SBCs) by reconstruction of the articular surface with osteochondral grafts. Study Design - Case series of horses with SBCs unresponsive to conservative therapy. Animals - Eleven horses (1-12 years). Methods - SBCs were identified in 4 locations: medial femoral condyle (5 horses), lateral femoral condyle (1), distal epiphysis of the metacarpus (4), or metatarsus (1). Osteochondral autograft transplantation (mosaic arthroplasty) was performed, taking grafts from the abaxial border of the medial femoral trochlea of the unaffected limb. Graft implantation was achieved through a small arthrotomy or by arthroscopy depending on SBC location. Results - All horses improved postoperatively; 10 horses had successful outcomes with radiographic evidence of successful graft incorporation and 7 returned to a previous or higher activity level. On follow-up arthroscopy (5 horses) there was successful reconstitution of a functional gliding surface. One horse had delayed incorporation of a graft because of a technical error but became sound. One horse had recurrence after 4 years of work and soundness. One stallion was used for breeding and light riding because of medial meniscal injuries on the same limb. Conclusions - Implantation of osteochondral grafts should be considered for SBC when conservative management has not improved lameness and there is a risk of further joint injury and degeneration. Clinical Relevance - Mosaic arthroplasty should be considered for treatment of subchondral bone cysts of the femoral condyle and distal articular surface of the metacarpus/tarsus in horses that are refractory to non-surgical management.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)588-596
Number of pages9
JournalVeterinary Surgery
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2004

Fingerprint

Subchondral Arthroplasty
Stifle
Bone Cysts
joints (animal)
lesions (animal)
Horses
Joints
horses
bones
thighs
Thigh
Transplants
metacarpus
Therapeutics
Metacarpus
arthroscopy
limbs (animal)
Arthroscopy
Bone and Bones
Arthroplasty

Keywords

  • Articular graft
  • Femoral condyle
  • Horse
  • Metacarpus
  • Mosaic arthroplasty
  • Subchondral bone cyst

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Autologous osteochondral grafting (mosaic arthroplasty) for treatment of subchondral cystic lesions in the equine stifle and fetlock joints. / Bodo, Gabor; Hangody, L.; Modis, Laszlo; Hurtig, Mark.

In: Veterinary Surgery, Vol. 33, No. 6, 11.2004, p. 588-596.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a7b96f6ad6514f25b66dfbd678a32ab0,
title = "Autologous osteochondral grafting (mosaic arthroplasty) for treatment of subchondral cystic lesions in the equine stifle and fetlock joints",
abstract = "Objective - To describe treatment of equine subchondral bone cysts (SBCs) by reconstruction of the articular surface with osteochondral grafts. Study Design - Case series of horses with SBCs unresponsive to conservative therapy. Animals - Eleven horses (1-12 years). Methods - SBCs were identified in 4 locations: medial femoral condyle (5 horses), lateral femoral condyle (1), distal epiphysis of the metacarpus (4), or metatarsus (1). Osteochondral autograft transplantation (mosaic arthroplasty) was performed, taking grafts from the abaxial border of the medial femoral trochlea of the unaffected limb. Graft implantation was achieved through a small arthrotomy or by arthroscopy depending on SBC location. Results - All horses improved postoperatively; 10 horses had successful outcomes with radiographic evidence of successful graft incorporation and 7 returned to a previous or higher activity level. On follow-up arthroscopy (5 horses) there was successful reconstitution of a functional gliding surface. One horse had delayed incorporation of a graft because of a technical error but became sound. One horse had recurrence after 4 years of work and soundness. One stallion was used for breeding and light riding because of medial meniscal injuries on the same limb. Conclusions - Implantation of osteochondral grafts should be considered for SBC when conservative management has not improved lameness and there is a risk of further joint injury and degeneration. Clinical Relevance - Mosaic arthroplasty should be considered for treatment of subchondral bone cysts of the femoral condyle and distal articular surface of the metacarpus/tarsus in horses that are refractory to non-surgical management.",
keywords = "Articular graft, Femoral condyle, Horse, Metacarpus, Mosaic arthroplasty, Subchondral bone cyst",
author = "Gabor Bodo and L. Hangody and Laszlo Modis and Mark Hurtig",
year = "2004",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1111/j.1532-950X.2004.04096.x",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "588--596",
journal = "Veterinary Surgery",
issn = "0161-3499",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Autologous osteochondral grafting (mosaic arthroplasty) for treatment of subchondral cystic lesions in the equine stifle and fetlock joints

AU - Bodo, Gabor

AU - Hangody, L.

AU - Modis, Laszlo

AU - Hurtig, Mark

PY - 2004/11

Y1 - 2004/11

N2 - Objective - To describe treatment of equine subchondral bone cysts (SBCs) by reconstruction of the articular surface with osteochondral grafts. Study Design - Case series of horses with SBCs unresponsive to conservative therapy. Animals - Eleven horses (1-12 years). Methods - SBCs were identified in 4 locations: medial femoral condyle (5 horses), lateral femoral condyle (1), distal epiphysis of the metacarpus (4), or metatarsus (1). Osteochondral autograft transplantation (mosaic arthroplasty) was performed, taking grafts from the abaxial border of the medial femoral trochlea of the unaffected limb. Graft implantation was achieved through a small arthrotomy or by arthroscopy depending on SBC location. Results - All horses improved postoperatively; 10 horses had successful outcomes with radiographic evidence of successful graft incorporation and 7 returned to a previous or higher activity level. On follow-up arthroscopy (5 horses) there was successful reconstitution of a functional gliding surface. One horse had delayed incorporation of a graft because of a technical error but became sound. One horse had recurrence after 4 years of work and soundness. One stallion was used for breeding and light riding because of medial meniscal injuries on the same limb. Conclusions - Implantation of osteochondral grafts should be considered for SBC when conservative management has not improved lameness and there is a risk of further joint injury and degeneration. Clinical Relevance - Mosaic arthroplasty should be considered for treatment of subchondral bone cysts of the femoral condyle and distal articular surface of the metacarpus/tarsus in horses that are refractory to non-surgical management.

AB - Objective - To describe treatment of equine subchondral bone cysts (SBCs) by reconstruction of the articular surface with osteochondral grafts. Study Design - Case series of horses with SBCs unresponsive to conservative therapy. Animals - Eleven horses (1-12 years). Methods - SBCs were identified in 4 locations: medial femoral condyle (5 horses), lateral femoral condyle (1), distal epiphysis of the metacarpus (4), or metatarsus (1). Osteochondral autograft transplantation (mosaic arthroplasty) was performed, taking grafts from the abaxial border of the medial femoral trochlea of the unaffected limb. Graft implantation was achieved through a small arthrotomy or by arthroscopy depending on SBC location. Results - All horses improved postoperatively; 10 horses had successful outcomes with radiographic evidence of successful graft incorporation and 7 returned to a previous or higher activity level. On follow-up arthroscopy (5 horses) there was successful reconstitution of a functional gliding surface. One horse had delayed incorporation of a graft because of a technical error but became sound. One horse had recurrence after 4 years of work and soundness. One stallion was used for breeding and light riding because of medial meniscal injuries on the same limb. Conclusions - Implantation of osteochondral grafts should be considered for SBC when conservative management has not improved lameness and there is a risk of further joint injury and degeneration. Clinical Relevance - Mosaic arthroplasty should be considered for treatment of subchondral bone cysts of the femoral condyle and distal articular surface of the metacarpus/tarsus in horses that are refractory to non-surgical management.

KW - Articular graft

KW - Femoral condyle

KW - Horse

KW - Metacarpus

KW - Mosaic arthroplasty

KW - Subchondral bone cyst

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=13744254040&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=13744254040&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1532-950X.2004.04096.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1532-950X.2004.04096.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 15659013

AN - SCOPUS:13744254040

VL - 33

SP - 588

EP - 596

JO - Veterinary Surgery

JF - Veterinary Surgery

SN - 0161-3499

IS - 6

ER -