Atypical sleep architecture and altered EEG spectra in Williams syndrome

F. Gombos, R. Bódizs, I. Kovács

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder characterised by physical abnormalities and a distinctive cognitive profile with intellectual disabilities (IDs) and learning difficulties. Methods In our study, nine adolescents and young adults with WS and 9 age- and sex-matched typically developing (TD) participants underwent polysomnography. We examined sleep architecture, leg movements and the electroencephalogram (EEG) spectra of specific frequency bands at different scalp locations. Results We found an atypical, WS characteristic sleep pattern with decreased sleep time, decreased sleep efficiency, increased wake time after sleep onset, increased non-rapid eye movement percentage, increased slow wave sleep, decreased rapid eye movement sleep percentage, increased number of leg movements and irregular sleep cycles. Patients with WS showed an increased delta and slow wave activity and decreased alpha and sigma activity in the spectral analysis of the EEG. Conclusions Sleep maintenance and organisation are significantly affected in WS, while EEG spectra suggest increases in sleep pressure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)255-262
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Intellectual Disability Research
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011

Fingerprint

Williams Syndrome
Electroencephalography
Sleep
Leg
Electroencephalogram
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Polysomnography
REM Sleep
Eye Movements
Scalp
Intellectual Disability
Young Adult
Maintenance
Learning

Keywords

  • Developmental disorders
  • EEG spectra
  • Polysomnography
  • Sleep EEG
  • Sleep stages
  • Williams syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Atypical sleep architecture and altered EEG spectra in Williams syndrome. / Gombos, F.; Bódizs, R.; Kovács, I.

In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, Vol. 55, No. 3, 03.2011, p. 255-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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