Atrial natriuretic peptide reduces the severe consequences of coronary artery occlusion in anaesthetized dogs

Mohamed Ali Rastegar, A. Végh, J. Papp, J. Parratt

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18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the responses to coronary artery occlusion. In chloralose-urethane anaesthetised mongrel dogs either saline (controls) or human synthetic ANP was infused intravenously (10 μg kg-1 + 0.1 μg kg-1 min-1), starting 30 min before and continuing 10 min during a 25 min occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). ANP infusion resulted in a fall in mean arterial blood pressure (by 17 ± 2 mmHg, p <0.05), a transient (max. at 5 min) increase in coronary blood flow (by 24 ± 5 ml min-1, p <0.05), and a reduction in coronary vascular resistance (by 0.27 ± 0.05 mmHg ml-1, p <0.05). When the LAD coronary artery was occluded, there was a less marked elevation in left ventricular enddiastolic pressure (LVEDP) in the ANP-treated dogs than in the controls (9.0 ± 0.9 versus 12.2 ± 0.8 mmHg, p <0.05). Compared to the controls, ANP reduced the number of ventricular premature beats (VPBs, 26 ± 12 versus 416 ± 87, p <0.05), the number of episodes of ventricular tachycardia per dogs (VT, 0.7 ± 0.3 versus 12.4 ± 4.2, p <0.05), and the incidences of VT (45% versus 100%, p <0.05) and ventricular fibrillation (VF 18% versus 57%, p <0.05) during occlusion. Reperfusion of the ischaemic myocardium at the end of the occlusion period led to VF in all the control dogs (survival from the combined ischaemia-reperfusion insult was therefore 0%), but VF following reperfusion was much less in the dogs given ANP (survival 64%; p <0.05). The severity of myocardial ischaemia, as assessed from changes in the epicardial ST-segment and the degree of inhomogeneity, was significantly less marked in dogs given ANP. We conclude that ANP protects the myocardium from the consequences of myocardial ischaemia resulting from acute coronary artery occlusion and reperfusion in anaesthetized dogs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)471-479
Number of pages9
JournalCardiovascular Drugs and Therapy
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Coronary Occlusion
Atrial Natriuretic Factor
Coronary Vessels
Dogs
Reperfusion
Myocardial Ischemia
Myocardium
Arterial Pressure
Myocardial Reperfusion
Chloralose
Ventricular Premature Complexes
Urethane
Ventricular Fibrillation
Ventricular Pressure
Ventricular Tachycardia
Vascular Resistance
Ischemia
Survival
Incidence

Keywords

  • Arrhythmias
  • Atrial natriuretic peptide
  • Ischaemia
  • Myocardial protection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

@article{3a687c338d774e44995be95d27a889f2,
title = "Atrial natriuretic peptide reduces the severe consequences of coronary artery occlusion in anaesthetized dogs",
abstract = "The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the responses to coronary artery occlusion. In chloralose-urethane anaesthetised mongrel dogs either saline (controls) or human synthetic ANP was infused intravenously (10 μg kg-1 + 0.1 μg kg-1 min-1), starting 30 min before and continuing 10 min during a 25 min occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). ANP infusion resulted in a fall in mean arterial blood pressure (by 17 ± 2 mmHg, p <0.05), a transient (max. at 5 min) increase in coronary blood flow (by 24 ± 5 ml min-1, p <0.05), and a reduction in coronary vascular resistance (by 0.27 ± 0.05 mmHg ml-1, p <0.05). When the LAD coronary artery was occluded, there was a less marked elevation in left ventricular enddiastolic pressure (LVEDP) in the ANP-treated dogs than in the controls (9.0 ± 0.9 versus 12.2 ± 0.8 mmHg, p <0.05). Compared to the controls, ANP reduced the number of ventricular premature beats (VPBs, 26 ± 12 versus 416 ± 87, p <0.05), the number of episodes of ventricular tachycardia per dogs (VT, 0.7 ± 0.3 versus 12.4 ± 4.2, p <0.05), and the incidences of VT (45{\%} versus 100{\%}, p <0.05) and ventricular fibrillation (VF 18{\%} versus 57{\%}, p <0.05) during occlusion. Reperfusion of the ischaemic myocardium at the end of the occlusion period led to VF in all the control dogs (survival from the combined ischaemia-reperfusion insult was therefore 0{\%}), but VF following reperfusion was much less in the dogs given ANP (survival 64{\%}; p <0.05). The severity of myocardial ischaemia, as assessed from changes in the epicardial ST-segment and the degree of inhomogeneity, was significantly less marked in dogs given ANP. We conclude that ANP protects the myocardium from the consequences of myocardial ischaemia resulting from acute coronary artery occlusion and reperfusion in anaesthetized dogs.",
keywords = "Arrhythmias, Atrial natriuretic peptide, Ischaemia, Myocardial protection",
author = "Rastegar, {Mohamed Ali} and A. V{\'e}gh and J. Papp and J. Parratt",
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T1 - Atrial natriuretic peptide reduces the severe consequences of coronary artery occlusion in anaesthetized dogs

AU - Rastegar, Mohamed Ali

AU - Végh, A.

AU - Papp, J.

AU - Parratt, J.

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the responses to coronary artery occlusion. In chloralose-urethane anaesthetised mongrel dogs either saline (controls) or human synthetic ANP was infused intravenously (10 μg kg-1 + 0.1 μg kg-1 min-1), starting 30 min before and continuing 10 min during a 25 min occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). ANP infusion resulted in a fall in mean arterial blood pressure (by 17 ± 2 mmHg, p <0.05), a transient (max. at 5 min) increase in coronary blood flow (by 24 ± 5 ml min-1, p <0.05), and a reduction in coronary vascular resistance (by 0.27 ± 0.05 mmHg ml-1, p <0.05). When the LAD coronary artery was occluded, there was a less marked elevation in left ventricular enddiastolic pressure (LVEDP) in the ANP-treated dogs than in the controls (9.0 ± 0.9 versus 12.2 ± 0.8 mmHg, p <0.05). Compared to the controls, ANP reduced the number of ventricular premature beats (VPBs, 26 ± 12 versus 416 ± 87, p <0.05), the number of episodes of ventricular tachycardia per dogs (VT, 0.7 ± 0.3 versus 12.4 ± 4.2, p <0.05), and the incidences of VT (45% versus 100%, p <0.05) and ventricular fibrillation (VF 18% versus 57%, p <0.05) during occlusion. Reperfusion of the ischaemic myocardium at the end of the occlusion period led to VF in all the control dogs (survival from the combined ischaemia-reperfusion insult was therefore 0%), but VF following reperfusion was much less in the dogs given ANP (survival 64%; p <0.05). The severity of myocardial ischaemia, as assessed from changes in the epicardial ST-segment and the degree of inhomogeneity, was significantly less marked in dogs given ANP. We conclude that ANP protects the myocardium from the consequences of myocardial ischaemia resulting from acute coronary artery occlusion and reperfusion in anaesthetized dogs.

AB - The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the responses to coronary artery occlusion. In chloralose-urethane anaesthetised mongrel dogs either saline (controls) or human synthetic ANP was infused intravenously (10 μg kg-1 + 0.1 μg kg-1 min-1), starting 30 min before and continuing 10 min during a 25 min occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). ANP infusion resulted in a fall in mean arterial blood pressure (by 17 ± 2 mmHg, p <0.05), a transient (max. at 5 min) increase in coronary blood flow (by 24 ± 5 ml min-1, p <0.05), and a reduction in coronary vascular resistance (by 0.27 ± 0.05 mmHg ml-1, p <0.05). When the LAD coronary artery was occluded, there was a less marked elevation in left ventricular enddiastolic pressure (LVEDP) in the ANP-treated dogs than in the controls (9.0 ± 0.9 versus 12.2 ± 0.8 mmHg, p <0.05). Compared to the controls, ANP reduced the number of ventricular premature beats (VPBs, 26 ± 12 versus 416 ± 87, p <0.05), the number of episodes of ventricular tachycardia per dogs (VT, 0.7 ± 0.3 versus 12.4 ± 4.2, p <0.05), and the incidences of VT (45% versus 100%, p <0.05) and ventricular fibrillation (VF 18% versus 57%, p <0.05) during occlusion. Reperfusion of the ischaemic myocardium at the end of the occlusion period led to VF in all the control dogs (survival from the combined ischaemia-reperfusion insult was therefore 0%), but VF following reperfusion was much less in the dogs given ANP (survival 64%; p <0.05). The severity of myocardial ischaemia, as assessed from changes in the epicardial ST-segment and the degree of inhomogeneity, was significantly less marked in dogs given ANP. We conclude that ANP protects the myocardium from the consequences of myocardial ischaemia resulting from acute coronary artery occlusion and reperfusion in anaesthetized dogs.

KW - Arrhythmias

KW - Atrial natriuretic peptide

KW - Ischaemia

KW - Myocardial protection

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