Athletic heart: The possible role of impaired repolarization reserve in development of sudden cardiac death

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

A number of sudden deaths involving young competitive athletes were reported in recent years. Sudden death among athletes is rare, but in a significant number of these cases the cause is not established and is mostly attributed to ventricular fibrillation. Physical conditioning in competitive athletes induces cardiovascular adaptation including lower resting heart rate (increased vagal tone) and increased cardiac mass (hypertrophy) and volume as a consequence of increased demand on the cardiovascular system, called "athlete's heart". Myocardial hypertrophy has been shown to cause electrophysiological remodeling where the expression of different ion channels is altered. Since the duration of repolarization depends on cycle length, the low heart rate in athletes also leads to prolonged repolarization. It is conceivable that prolonged repolarization and a possibly impaired repolarization reserve due to myocardial hypertrophy-induced downregulation of potassium currents might represent increased risk for the development of ventricular arrhythmias, including Torsades de Pointes ventricular tachycardia (TdP) that can degenerate into ventricular fibrillation and lead to sudden cardiac death in athletes. The reliable prediction of TdP remains unsatisfactory. Short-term variability (STV) of the QT interval is a novel parameter used in the assessment of arrhythmic risk. STV of repolarization can increase in case of decreased repolarization reserve even when there are no noticable changes in the duration of cardiac repolarization. STV may be significantly larger in competitive athletes and may be an early indicator of increased instability of cardiac repolarization and a higher arrhythmia propensity in this population.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAthlete Performance and Injuries
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages123-143
Number of pages21
ISBN (Print)9781619426580
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2012

Fingerprint

Sudden Cardiac Death
athlete
Athletes
Sports
death
Ventricular Fibrillation
Sudden Death
Hypertrophy
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Heart Rate
Torsades de Pointes
Cardiac Volume
cause
Cardiomegaly
Ventricular Tachycardia
Cardiovascular System
conditioning
Ion Channels
Potassium
Down-Regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Baczkó, I., Orosz, A., Lengyel, C., & Varró, A. (2012). Athletic heart: The possible role of impaired repolarization reserve in development of sudden cardiac death. In Athlete Performance and Injuries (pp. 123-143). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..

Athletic heart : The possible role of impaired repolarization reserve in development of sudden cardiac death. / Baczkó, I.; Orosz, Andrea; Lengyel, C.; Varró, A.

Athlete Performance and Injuries. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2012. p. 123-143.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Baczkó, I, Orosz, A, Lengyel, C & Varró, A 2012, Athletic heart: The possible role of impaired repolarization reserve in development of sudden cardiac death. in Athlete Performance and Injuries. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., pp. 123-143.
Baczkó I, Orosz A, Lengyel C, Varró A. Athletic heart: The possible role of impaired repolarization reserve in development of sudden cardiac death. In Athlete Performance and Injuries. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2012. p. 123-143
Baczkó, I. ; Orosz, Andrea ; Lengyel, C. ; Varró, A. / Athletic heart : The possible role of impaired repolarization reserve in development of sudden cardiac death. Athlete Performance and Injuries. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2012. pp. 123-143
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