Asynchronous snowdrift game with synergistic effect as a model of cooperation

Ádám Kun, Gergely Boza, I. Scheuring

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The snowdrift (or chicken) game emerges as a new paradigm in the study of nonkin cooperation in animals. Many situations, for example, cooperative hunting, group foraging, territorial defense, predator watching, or parental care, can be adequately described as a snowdrift game. In this paper, we investigate the asynchronous version of the game in which, contrary to the rather unrealistic assumption of simultaneous moves, one of the players acts first and the other responds by knowing its decision. Players are assigned to be first or second movers randomly and with the same probability. We found that both a synergistic effect of cooperation (i.e., cooperative effort is better than the sum of the individual efforts) and population structure (low dispersal, spatial confinement, or group formation) are crucial for mutual cooperation to emerge. Otherwise, only one of the players will carry the burden of cooperation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)633-641
Number of pages9
JournalBehavioral Ecology
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2006

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cooperatives
Chickens
Population
population structure
foraging
chickens
predators
parental care
hunting
animals
predator
co-operation
effect
animal

Keywords

  • Chicken game
  • Cooperation
  • Game theory
  • Snowdrift game

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Ecology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Asynchronous snowdrift game with synergistic effect as a model of cooperation. / Kun, Ádám; Boza, Gergely; Scheuring, I.

In: Behavioral Ecology, Vol. 17, No. 4, 07.2006, p. 633-641.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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