Asymmetric perturbations of signalling oligomers

G. Maksay, Orsolya Toke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This review focuses on rapid and reversible noncovalent interactions for symmetric oligomers of signalling proteins. Symmetry mismatch, transient symmetry breaking and asymmetric perturbations via chemical (ligand binding) and physical (electric or mechanic) effects can initiate the signalling events. Advanced biophysical methods can reveal not only structural symmetries of stable membrane-bound signalling proteins but also asymmetric functional transition states. Relevant techniques amenable to distinguish between symmetric and asymmetric architectures are discussed including those with the capability of capturing low-populated transient conformational states. Typical examples of signalling proteins are overviewed for symmetry breaking in dimers (GPCRs, growth factor receptors, transcription factors); trimers (acid-sensing ion channels); tetramers (voltage-gated cation channels, ionotropic glutamate receptor, CNG and CHN channels); pentameric ligand-gated and mechanosensitive channels; higher order oligomers (gap junction channel, chaperonins, proteasome, virus capsid); as well as primary and secondary transporters. In conclusion, asymmetric perturbations seem to play important functional roles in a broad range of communicating networks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-169
Number of pages17
JournalProgress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology
Volume114
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Acid Sensing Ion Channels
Chaperonins
Ligand-Gated Ion Channels
Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors
Proteins
Growth Factor Receptors
Capsid
Gap Junctions
Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex
Cations
Transcription Factors
Ligands
Viruses
Membranes

Keywords

  • Asymmetric activation
  • Biophysical structural techniques
  • Ion channels
  • Symmetric protein oligomers
  • Symmetry-asymmetry distinction
  • Transporters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Biophysics
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Asymmetric perturbations of signalling oligomers. / Maksay, G.; Toke, Orsolya.

In: Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology, Vol. 114, No. 3, 2014, p. 153-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{94c83e6e6a154ef9ae21b1e62bad65e5,
title = "Asymmetric perturbations of signalling oligomers",
abstract = "This review focuses on rapid and reversible noncovalent interactions for symmetric oligomers of signalling proteins. Symmetry mismatch, transient symmetry breaking and asymmetric perturbations via chemical (ligand binding) and physical (electric or mechanic) effects can initiate the signalling events. Advanced biophysical methods can reveal not only structural symmetries of stable membrane-bound signalling proteins but also asymmetric functional transition states. Relevant techniques amenable to distinguish between symmetric and asymmetric architectures are discussed including those with the capability of capturing low-populated transient conformational states. Typical examples of signalling proteins are overviewed for symmetry breaking in dimers (GPCRs, growth factor receptors, transcription factors); trimers (acid-sensing ion channels); tetramers (voltage-gated cation channels, ionotropic glutamate receptor, CNG and CHN channels); pentameric ligand-gated and mechanosensitive channels; higher order oligomers (gap junction channel, chaperonins, proteasome, virus capsid); as well as primary and secondary transporters. In conclusion, asymmetric perturbations seem to play important functional roles in a broad range of communicating networks.",
keywords = "Asymmetric activation, Biophysical structural techniques, Ion channels, Symmetric protein oligomers, Symmetry-asymmetry distinction, Transporters",
author = "G. Maksay and Orsolya Toke",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1016/j.pbiomolbio.2014.03.001",
language = "English",
volume = "114",
pages = "153--169",
journal = "Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology",
issn = "0079-6107",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Asymmetric perturbations of signalling oligomers

AU - Maksay, G.

AU - Toke, Orsolya

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - This review focuses on rapid and reversible noncovalent interactions for symmetric oligomers of signalling proteins. Symmetry mismatch, transient symmetry breaking and asymmetric perturbations via chemical (ligand binding) and physical (electric or mechanic) effects can initiate the signalling events. Advanced biophysical methods can reveal not only structural symmetries of stable membrane-bound signalling proteins but also asymmetric functional transition states. Relevant techniques amenable to distinguish between symmetric and asymmetric architectures are discussed including those with the capability of capturing low-populated transient conformational states. Typical examples of signalling proteins are overviewed for symmetry breaking in dimers (GPCRs, growth factor receptors, transcription factors); trimers (acid-sensing ion channels); tetramers (voltage-gated cation channels, ionotropic glutamate receptor, CNG and CHN channels); pentameric ligand-gated and mechanosensitive channels; higher order oligomers (gap junction channel, chaperonins, proteasome, virus capsid); as well as primary and secondary transporters. In conclusion, asymmetric perturbations seem to play important functional roles in a broad range of communicating networks.

AB - This review focuses on rapid and reversible noncovalent interactions for symmetric oligomers of signalling proteins. Symmetry mismatch, transient symmetry breaking and asymmetric perturbations via chemical (ligand binding) and physical (electric or mechanic) effects can initiate the signalling events. Advanced biophysical methods can reveal not only structural symmetries of stable membrane-bound signalling proteins but also asymmetric functional transition states. Relevant techniques amenable to distinguish between symmetric and asymmetric architectures are discussed including those with the capability of capturing low-populated transient conformational states. Typical examples of signalling proteins are overviewed for symmetry breaking in dimers (GPCRs, growth factor receptors, transcription factors); trimers (acid-sensing ion channels); tetramers (voltage-gated cation channels, ionotropic glutamate receptor, CNG and CHN channels); pentameric ligand-gated and mechanosensitive channels; higher order oligomers (gap junction channel, chaperonins, proteasome, virus capsid); as well as primary and secondary transporters. In conclusion, asymmetric perturbations seem to play important functional roles in a broad range of communicating networks.

KW - Asymmetric activation

KW - Biophysical structural techniques

KW - Ion channels

KW - Symmetric protein oligomers

KW - Symmetry-asymmetry distinction

KW - Transporters

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84900468252&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84900468252&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.pbiomolbio.2014.03.001

DO - 10.1016/j.pbiomolbio.2014.03.001

M3 - Article

C2 - 24650570

AN - SCOPUS:84900468252

VL - 114

SP - 153

EP - 169

JO - Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology

JF - Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology

SN - 0079-6107

IS - 3

ER -