Association of physical activity with body-composition indexes in children aged 6-8 y at varied risk of obesity

Kirsten L. Rennie, B. Livingstone, Jonathan C K Wells, A. McGloin, W. Andrew Coward, Andrew M. Prentice, Susan A. Jebb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Physical inactivity increases the risk of obesity, but the relations between reported levels of physical activity (PA) and measures of body fatness (BF) in children are remarkably inconsistent. Objective: We examined the relation between objective measures of PA and body-composition indexes in nonobese children. Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 100 children aged 6-8 y who were recruited according to their risk of future obesity: high-risk children had > 1 obese parent [body mass index (BMI; in kg/m 2): >30] and low-risk children had 2 nonobese biological parents (BMI: <30). Free-living activity energy expenditure (AEE) and PA level were calculated from 7-d doubly labeled water measurements, time spent in light-intensity activity was assessed by heart rate monitoring, and body composition was determined from isotopic dilution. To adjust for body size, fat mass and fat-free mass were normalized for height and expressed as fat mass index (FMI) and lean mass index (LMI), respectively. Results: High-risk children had significantly higher BMI, LMI, and FMI than did low-risk children, but no group differences in PA were found. AEE and PA level were positively associated with LMI and, after adjustment for sex and fat-free mass, negatively associated with FMI but not with BMI. Boys who spent more than the median time in light-intensity activities had significantly higher FMI than did less sedentary boys. This difference was not observed in girls. Conclusions: AEE and PA level were negatively associated with BF in nonobese children. Accurate measures of body composition are essential to appropriate assessment of relations between PA and obesity risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13-20
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume82
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Body Composition
Obesity
Exercise
Fats
Energy Metabolism
Body Weights and Measures
Light
Body Size
Body Mass Index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Heart Rate
Parents
Water

Keywords

  • Body composition
  • Children
  • Energy expenditure
  • Obesity
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Rennie, K. L., Livingstone, B., Wells, J. C. K., McGloin, A., Coward, W. A., Prentice, A. M., & Jebb, S. A. (2005). Association of physical activity with body-composition indexes in children aged 6-8 y at varied risk of obesity. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 82(1), 13-20.

Association of physical activity with body-composition indexes in children aged 6-8 y at varied risk of obesity. / Rennie, Kirsten L.; Livingstone, B.; Wells, Jonathan C K; McGloin, A.; Coward, W. Andrew; Prentice, Andrew M.; Jebb, Susan A.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 82, No. 1, 2005, p. 13-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rennie, KL, Livingstone, B, Wells, JCK, McGloin, A, Coward, WA, Prentice, AM & Jebb, SA 2005, 'Association of physical activity with body-composition indexes in children aged 6-8 y at varied risk of obesity', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 82, no. 1, pp. 13-20.
Rennie, Kirsten L. ; Livingstone, B. ; Wells, Jonathan C K ; McGloin, A. ; Coward, W. Andrew ; Prentice, Andrew M. ; Jebb, Susan A. / Association of physical activity with body-composition indexes in children aged 6-8 y at varied risk of obesity. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2005 ; Vol. 82, No. 1. pp. 13-20.
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