Association of objectively measured physical activity with body components in European adolescents

David Jiménez-Pavón, Amaya Fernández-Vázquez, Ute Alexy, Raquel Pedrero, Magdalena Cuenca-García, Angela Polito, Jérémy Vanhelst, Yannis Manios, Anthony Kafatos, D. Molnár, Michael Sjöström, Luis A. Moreno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Physical activity (PA) is suggested to contribute to fat loss not only through increasing energy expenditure "per se" but also increasing muscle mass; therefore, it would be interesting to better understand the specific associations of PA with the different body's components such as fat mass and muscle mass. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between objectively measured PA and indices of fat mass and muscle components independently of each other giving, at the same time, gender-specific information in a wide cohort of European adolescents. Methods. A cross-sectional study in a school setting was conducted in 2200 (1016 males) adolescents (14.7 ±1.2 years). Weight, height, skinfold thickness, bioimpedance and PA (accelerometry) were measured. Indices of fat mass (body mass index, % fat mass, sum of skinfolds) and muscular component (assessed as fat-free mass) were calculated. Multiple regression analyses were performed adjusting for several confounders including fat-free mass and fat mass when possible. Results: Vigorous PA was positively associated with height (p <0.05) in males, whilst, vigorous PA, moderate-vigorous PA and average PA were negatively associated with all the indices of fat mass (all p <0.01) in both genders, except for average PA in relation with body mass index in females. Regarding muscular components, vigorous PA showed positive associations with fat-free mass and muscle mass (all p <0.05) in both genders. Average PA was positively associated with fat-free mass (both p <0.05) in males and females. Conclusion: The present study suggests that PA, especially vigorous PA, is negatively associated with indices of fat mass and positively associated with markers of muscle mass, after adjusting for several confounders (including indices of fat mass and muscle mass when possible). Future studies should focus not only on the classical relationship between PA and fat mass, but also on PA and muscular components, analyzing the independent role of both with the different PA intensities.

Original languageEnglish
Article number667
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Exercise
Fats
Muscles
Body Mass Index
Accelerometry
Skinfold Thickness
Energy Metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Regression Analysis
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Fat mass
  • Muscular components
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Jiménez-Pavón, D., Fernández-Vázquez, A., Alexy, U., Pedrero, R., Cuenca-García, M., Polito, A., ... Moreno, L. A. (2013). Association of objectively measured physical activity with body components in European adolescents. BMC Public Health, 13(1), [667]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-13-667

Association of objectively measured physical activity with body components in European adolescents. / Jiménez-Pavón, David; Fernández-Vázquez, Amaya; Alexy, Ute; Pedrero, Raquel; Cuenca-García, Magdalena; Polito, Angela; Vanhelst, Jérémy; Manios, Yannis; Kafatos, Anthony; Molnár, D.; Sjöström, Michael; Moreno, Luis A.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 13, No. 1, 667, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jiménez-Pavón, D, Fernández-Vázquez, A, Alexy, U, Pedrero, R, Cuenca-García, M, Polito, A, Vanhelst, J, Manios, Y, Kafatos, A, Molnár, D, Sjöström, M & Moreno, LA 2013, 'Association of objectively measured physical activity with body components in European adolescents', BMC Public Health, vol. 13, no. 1, 667. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-13-667
Jiménez-Pavón D, Fernández-Vázquez A, Alexy U, Pedrero R, Cuenca-García M, Polito A et al. Association of objectively measured physical activity with body components in European adolescents. BMC Public Health. 2013;13(1). 667. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-13-667
Jiménez-Pavón, David ; Fernández-Vázquez, Amaya ; Alexy, Ute ; Pedrero, Raquel ; Cuenca-García, Magdalena ; Polito, Angela ; Vanhelst, Jérémy ; Manios, Yannis ; Kafatos, Anthony ; Molnár, D. ; Sjöström, Michael ; Moreno, Luis A. / Association of objectively measured physical activity with body components in European adolescents. In: BMC Public Health. 2013 ; Vol. 13, No. 1.
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