Association of affective temperaments with blood pressure and arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients: A cross-sectional study

Andrea László, A. Tabák, Beáta Korösi, Dániel Eörsi, Péter Torzsa, Orsolya Cseprekál, A. Tislér, G. Reusz, Zsófia Nemcsik-Bencze, X. Gonda, Z. Ríhmer, János Nemcsik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Affective temperaments (anxious, depressive, cyclothymic, irritable and hyperthymic) measure subclinical manifestations of major mood disorders. Furthermore, cumulating evidence suggests their involvement in somatic disorders as well. We aimed to assess associations between affective temperament scores and blood pressure and arterial stiffness parameters in hypertensive patients. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 173 patients with well-controlled or grade 1 chronic hypertension, with no history of depression, completed the TEMPS-A, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A) questionnaires in three GP practices. Arterial stiffness was measured with tonometry (PulsePen). Results: According to multiple linear regression analysis, cyclothymic temperament score was positively associated with brachial systolic blood pressure independently of age, sex, total cholesterol, brachial diastolic blood pressure, BDI, HAM-A and the use of alprazolam (β = 0.529, p = 0.042), while hyperthymic temperament score was negatively related to augmentation index independent of age, sex, smoking, heart rate, BDI, HAM-A and the use of alprazolam (β = -0.612, p = 0.013). A significant interaction was found between cyclothymic temperament score and sex in predicting brachial systolic blood pressure (p = 0.025), between irritable and anxious temperament scores and sex in predicting pulse wave velocity (p = 0.021, p = 0.023, respectively) and an interaction with borderline significance between hyperthymic temperament score and sex in predicting augmentation index (p = 0.052). Conclusions: The present findings highlight elevated blood pressure among subjects with high cyclothymic temperament as well as an increased level of arterial stiffening in subjects with low hyperthymic scores suggesting that affective temperaments may play a role in the development of hypertension and arterial stiffening and may thus represent markers of cardiovascular risk. Sex differences were also present in these associations.

Original languageEnglish
Article number158
JournalBMC Cardiovascular Disorders
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 8 2016

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Vascular Stiffness
Temperament
Cross-Sectional Studies
Blood Pressure
Depression
Alprazolam
Arm
Anxiety
Equipment and Supplies
Hypertension
Pulse Wave Analysis
Manometry
Mood Disorders
Sex Characteristics
Linear Models
Heart Rate
Smoking
Cholesterol
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Affective temperament scores
  • Arterial stiffness
  • Augmentation index
  • Blood pressure
  • Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Association of affective temperaments with blood pressure and arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients : A cross-sectional study. / László, Andrea; Tabák, A.; Korösi, Beáta; Eörsi, Dániel; Torzsa, Péter; Cseprekál, Orsolya; Tislér, A.; Reusz, G.; Nemcsik-Bencze, Zsófia; Gonda, X.; Ríhmer, Z.; Nemcsik, János.

In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, Vol. 16, No. 1, 158, 08.08.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

László, Andrea ; Tabák, A. ; Korösi, Beáta ; Eörsi, Dániel ; Torzsa, Péter ; Cseprekál, Orsolya ; Tislér, A. ; Reusz, G. ; Nemcsik-Bencze, Zsófia ; Gonda, X. ; Ríhmer, Z. ; Nemcsik, János. / Association of affective temperaments with blood pressure and arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients : A cross-sectional study. In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders. 2016 ; Vol. 16, No. 1.
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AU - Tabák, A.

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AU - Eörsi, Dániel

AU - Torzsa, Péter

AU - Cseprekál, Orsolya

AU - Tislér, A.

AU - Reusz, G.

AU - Nemcsik-Bencze, Zsófia

AU - Gonda, X.

AU - Ríhmer, Z.

AU - Nemcsik, János

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N2 - Background: Affective temperaments (anxious, depressive, cyclothymic, irritable and hyperthymic) measure subclinical manifestations of major mood disorders. Furthermore, cumulating evidence suggests their involvement in somatic disorders as well. We aimed to assess associations between affective temperament scores and blood pressure and arterial stiffness parameters in hypertensive patients. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 173 patients with well-controlled or grade 1 chronic hypertension, with no history of depression, completed the TEMPS-A, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A) questionnaires in three GP practices. Arterial stiffness was measured with tonometry (PulsePen). Results: According to multiple linear regression analysis, cyclothymic temperament score was positively associated with brachial systolic blood pressure independently of age, sex, total cholesterol, brachial diastolic blood pressure, BDI, HAM-A and the use of alprazolam (β = 0.529, p = 0.042), while hyperthymic temperament score was negatively related to augmentation index independent of age, sex, smoking, heart rate, BDI, HAM-A and the use of alprazolam (β = -0.612, p = 0.013). A significant interaction was found between cyclothymic temperament score and sex in predicting brachial systolic blood pressure (p = 0.025), between irritable and anxious temperament scores and sex in predicting pulse wave velocity (p = 0.021, p = 0.023, respectively) and an interaction with borderline significance between hyperthymic temperament score and sex in predicting augmentation index (p = 0.052). Conclusions: The present findings highlight elevated blood pressure among subjects with high cyclothymic temperament as well as an increased level of arterial stiffening in subjects with low hyperthymic scores suggesting that affective temperaments may play a role in the development of hypertension and arterial stiffening and may thus represent markers of cardiovascular risk. Sex differences were also present in these associations.

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