Association between maternal panic disorders and pregnancy complications and delivery outcomes

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33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The objective of the study was to evaluate the possible association between panic disorders during pregnancy and pregnancy complications, as well as birth outcomes: gestational age and birth weight, as well as preterm birth/low birthweight in newborns. Methodology: Comparison of newborn infants (without any defects) born to mothers with or without panic disorder in the population-based large data set of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance System of Congenital Abnormalities. Main outcome measures were medically recorded pregnancy complications, as well as gestational age and birth weight, proportion of preterm birth and low birthweight. Principal findings: Of 38,151 controls, 187 (0.5%) had mothers with panic disorders during pregnancy. Among pregnancy complications, anemia and polyhydramnion showed a higher prevalence in women with panic disorder. There was a higher proportion of males among newborn infants born to mothers with panic diseases compared to newborn infants of mothers without panic disorders. Pregnant women with panic disorders had a shorter (0.4 week) gestational age (adjusted t = 2.3; p = 0.02) and a larger proportion of preterm births (17.1% versus 9.1%) (adjusted POR with 95% CI = 1.9, 1.3-2.8). However, there was no significant difference in the mean birth weight and rate of low birthweight between the two study groups. Conclusion: Panic disorders during pregnancy were associated with anemia, a shorter gestational age and a larger proportion of preterm birth. Further studies are needed to confirm and explain or disprove the male excess among newborn infants born to mothers with panic disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-52
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Obstetrics Gynecology and Reproductive Biology
Volume124
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2006

Fingerprint

Pregnancy Complications
Panic Disorder
Mothers
Premature Birth
Gestational Age
Newborn Infant
Birth Weight
Pregnancy
Anemia
Panic
Birth Rate
Pregnant Women
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parturition

Keywords

  • Delivery outcomes
  • Maternal panic disorders
  • Pregnancy complication
  • Preterm birth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Reproductive Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Association between maternal panic disorders and pregnancy complications and delivery outcomes",
abstract = "Background: The objective of the study was to evaluate the possible association between panic disorders during pregnancy and pregnancy complications, as well as birth outcomes: gestational age and birth weight, as well as preterm birth/low birthweight in newborns. Methodology: Comparison of newborn infants (without any defects) born to mothers with or without panic disorder in the population-based large data set of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance System of Congenital Abnormalities. Main outcome measures were medically recorded pregnancy complications, as well as gestational age and birth weight, proportion of preterm birth and low birthweight. Principal findings: Of 38,151 controls, 187 (0.5{\%}) had mothers with panic disorders during pregnancy. Among pregnancy complications, anemia and polyhydramnion showed a higher prevalence in women with panic disorder. There was a higher proportion of males among newborn infants born to mothers with panic diseases compared to newborn infants of mothers without panic disorders. Pregnant women with panic disorders had a shorter (0.4 week) gestational age (adjusted t = 2.3; p = 0.02) and a larger proportion of preterm births (17.1{\%} versus 9.1{\%}) (adjusted POR with 95{\%} CI = 1.9, 1.3-2.8). However, there was no significant difference in the mean birth weight and rate of low birthweight between the two study groups. Conclusion: Panic disorders during pregnancy were associated with anemia, a shorter gestational age and a larger proportion of preterm birth. Further studies are needed to confirm and explain or disprove the male excess among newborn infants born to mothers with panic disorders.",
keywords = "Delivery outcomes, Maternal panic disorders, Pregnancy complication, Preterm birth",
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N2 - Background: The objective of the study was to evaluate the possible association between panic disorders during pregnancy and pregnancy complications, as well as birth outcomes: gestational age and birth weight, as well as preterm birth/low birthweight in newborns. Methodology: Comparison of newborn infants (without any defects) born to mothers with or without panic disorder in the population-based large data set of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance System of Congenital Abnormalities. Main outcome measures were medically recorded pregnancy complications, as well as gestational age and birth weight, proportion of preterm birth and low birthweight. Principal findings: Of 38,151 controls, 187 (0.5%) had mothers with panic disorders during pregnancy. Among pregnancy complications, anemia and polyhydramnion showed a higher prevalence in women with panic disorder. There was a higher proportion of males among newborn infants born to mothers with panic diseases compared to newborn infants of mothers without panic disorders. Pregnant women with panic disorders had a shorter (0.4 week) gestational age (adjusted t = 2.3; p = 0.02) and a larger proportion of preterm births (17.1% versus 9.1%) (adjusted POR with 95% CI = 1.9, 1.3-2.8). However, there was no significant difference in the mean birth weight and rate of low birthweight between the two study groups. Conclusion: Panic disorders during pregnancy were associated with anemia, a shorter gestational age and a larger proportion of preterm birth. Further studies are needed to confirm and explain or disprove the male excess among newborn infants born to mothers with panic disorders.

AB - Background: The objective of the study was to evaluate the possible association between panic disorders during pregnancy and pregnancy complications, as well as birth outcomes: gestational age and birth weight, as well as preterm birth/low birthweight in newborns. Methodology: Comparison of newborn infants (without any defects) born to mothers with or without panic disorder in the population-based large data set of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance System of Congenital Abnormalities. Main outcome measures were medically recorded pregnancy complications, as well as gestational age and birth weight, proportion of preterm birth and low birthweight. Principal findings: Of 38,151 controls, 187 (0.5%) had mothers with panic disorders during pregnancy. Among pregnancy complications, anemia and polyhydramnion showed a higher prevalence in women with panic disorder. There was a higher proportion of males among newborn infants born to mothers with panic diseases compared to newborn infants of mothers without panic disorders. Pregnant women with panic disorders had a shorter (0.4 week) gestational age (adjusted t = 2.3; p = 0.02) and a larger proportion of preterm births (17.1% versus 9.1%) (adjusted POR with 95% CI = 1.9, 1.3-2.8). However, there was no significant difference in the mean birth weight and rate of low birthweight between the two study groups. Conclusion: Panic disorders during pregnancy were associated with anemia, a shorter gestational age and a larger proportion of preterm birth. Further studies are needed to confirm and explain or disprove the male excess among newborn infants born to mothers with panic disorders.

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