Association between common mental disorder and obesity over the adult life course

Mika Kivimäki, G. David Batty, Archana Singh-Manoux, Hermann Nabi, Séverine Sabia, Adam G. Tabak, Tasnime N. Akbaraly, Jussi Vahtera, Michael G. Marmot, Markus Jokela

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42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Prospective data on the association between common mental disorders and obesity are scarce, and the impact of ageing on this association is poorly understood. Aims: To examine the association between common mental disorders and obesity (body mass index ≥30kg/m2) across the adult life course. Method: The participants, 6820 men and 3346 women, aged 35-55 were screened four times during a 19-year follow-up (the Whitehall II study). Each screening included measurements of mental disorders (the General Health Questionnaire), weight and height. Results: The excess risk of obesity in the presence of mental disorders increased with age (P=0.004). The estimated proportion of people who were obese was 5.7% at age 40 both in the presence and absence of mental disorders, but the corresponding figures were 34.6% and 27.1% at age 70. The excess risk did not vary by gender or according to ethnic group or socioeconomic position. Conclusions: The association between common mental disorders and obesity becomes stronger at older ages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-155
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Volume195
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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    Kivimäki, M., Batty, G. D., Singh-Manoux, A., Nabi, H., Sabia, S., Tabak, A. G., Akbaraly, T. N., Vahtera, J., Marmot, M. G., & Jokela, M. (2009). Association between common mental disorder and obesity over the adult life course. British Journal of Psychiatry, 195(2), 149-155. https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.108.057299