Assisted reproductive research

Laser assisted hatching and spindle detection (spindle view technique)

Katalin Kanyó, J. Konc, L. Solti, S. Cseh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Animal experiments are very important for the development of new assisted reproductive techniques (ART) for use in human and animal reproductive medicine. Most technical aspects of reproductive manipulation of humans and animals are very similar, and many components of successful human ART used nowadays have been derived from animal studies. In this study we examined (1) the use of 'non-contact' laser for assisted hatching, (2) whether spindles in living mouse oocytes could safely be imaged/examined by polarisation microscope (polscope) and (3) the influence of environment (e.g. temperature, in vitro culture, etc.) on spindle detection/visualisation. The data of the study presented here show that (1) laser assisted hatching (AH) is a fast, very accurate and safe procedure without any harmful effect on embryo development and it can support very effectively the implantation of embryos, (2) the use of polscope facilitates the evaluation of oocyte quality and the selection of oocytes with spindle, (3) by monitoring the spindle position during intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), we can reduce spindle damage and increase the chance of fertilisation. Further studies are underway to test the hypothesised connection between spindle birefringence and developmental capacity of oocytes/embryos.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)113-123
Number of pages11
JournalActa Veterinaria Hungarica
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Oocytes
Lasers
oocytes
hatching
assisted reproductive technologies
Assisted Reproductive Techniques
Research
microscopes
lasers
Reproductive Medicine
Birefringence
intracytoplasmic sperm injection
embryo implantation
animals
Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injections
animal experimentation
fertilization (reproduction)
methodology
Fertilization
in vitro culture

Keywords

  • Assisted reproduction
  • Assisted reproductive techniques
  • Examination of spindles in oocytes
  • Laser assisted hatching
  • Spindle view technique

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Assisted reproductive research : Laser assisted hatching and spindle detection (spindle view technique). / Kanyó, Katalin; Konc, J.; Solti, L.; Cseh, S.

In: Acta Veterinaria Hungarica, Vol. 52, No. 1, 2004, p. 113-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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