Assessment of the efficacy of a hand-held suction device for sampling spiders: Improved density estimation or oversampling?

F. Samu, J. Németh, Balázs Kiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the study a comparison is made between the results of two sampling procedures, both based on the application of the same hand-held suction apparatus. Sampling was aimed at spiders, and was carried out on two alfalfa fields. In the first method suction sampling was applied to an enclosure area was samples intensively, which was facilitated by the removal of the vegetation. The second method was a transect sampling procedure during which the suction apparatus with a 0.01 m2 nozzle was applied to single unenclosed sampling point 1 m. A linear series of 48 such subsamples comprised a transect, thus the total area covered in transect equalled the area off the enclosure. In the transect samples three times more spiders were caught than in the enclosures. This result was on different occasions and art both fields. This basic trend was found in all spider families that were present in significant numbers in the samples. Species composition in the samples collected by he two methods was similar, and species abundance ranks were highly correlated across dates. We propose than an 'edge effect' can explain higher catches in transect samples. This edge effect is caused by lateral suction at the edges, which inflated the number of animals caught in the application.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)371-378
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Applied Biology
Volume130
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1997

Fingerprint

Spiders
Suction
Araneae
hands
Hand
Equipment and Supplies
sampling
Medicago sativa
Art
edge effects
nozzles
arts
alfalfa
methodology
species diversity

Keywords

  • Alfalfa
  • Arnaneae
  • Density estimation
  • Natural enemies
  • Sampling bias

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Assessment of the efficacy of a hand-held suction device for sampling spiders : Improved density estimation or oversampling? / Samu, F.; Németh, J.; Kiss, Balázs.

In: Annals of Applied Biology, Vol. 130, No. 2, 04.1997, p. 371-378.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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