Assessment of maternal reproductive morbidity among female physicians in Hungary

Zsuzsa Gyorffy, Szilvia Adam, M. Kopp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: High prevalence of work-related stress has been associated with miscarriage, premature birth, and low birth weight. However, reproductive health of female physicians has been scarcely researched in Hungary. Aim: To explore the prevalence and risk factors of maternal reproductive morbidity among female physicians in Hungary. Methods: Data were collected from 298 female physicians using questionnaires. 970 female white collar workers from a representative nationwide survey (Hungarostudy, 2002) served as controls. Results: The prevalence of miscarriage, high-risk pregnancy, and therapeutic termination of pregnancy among female physicians was around twice as high compared to those in the normative population (24.1 vs. 12.4%, 27.1 vs. 12.3%, and 35.3 vs. 23.4%, respectively). Using correlation analyses, we found a significant relationship between therapeutic termination of pregnancy and the frequency of night duty (p = 0.028) as well as the number of board certifications (p = 0.016). In addition, high prevalence of miscarriage significantly correlated with long working hours (> 8h/d) at the time of pregnancy (p = 0.05) and with the prevalence of role conflict (p = 0.0136, OR = 1.749, CI = 0.875-3.494). Conclusion: We found a significantly higher prevalence of maternal reproductive morbidity among female physicians compared to that in the control population. We have identified potential work-related risk factors including the frequency of night duty, long working hours, multiple board certifications, and perceived role conflict, which may serve as stressor predictors of maternal reproductive morbidity among female physicians in Hungary.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-72
Number of pages2
JournalPsychology and Health
Volume19
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2004

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Hungary
Mothers
Morbidity
Physicians
Spontaneous Abortion
Certification
Pregnancy
High-Risk Pregnancy
Reproductive Health
Premature Birth
Low Birth Weight Infant
Population
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Assessment of maternal reproductive morbidity among female physicians in Hungary. / Gyorffy, Zsuzsa; Adam, Szilvia; Kopp, M.

In: Psychology and Health, Vol. 19, No. SUPPL. 1, 06.2004, p. 71-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gyorffy, Zsuzsa ; Adam, Szilvia ; Kopp, M. / Assessment of maternal reproductive morbidity among female physicians in Hungary. In: Psychology and Health. 2004 ; Vol. 19, No. SUPPL. 1. pp. 71-72.
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