Assessment of heat provocation tests on the human gingiva

The effect of periodontal disease and smoking

E. Molnár, Zs. Lohinai, A. Demeter, B. Mikecs, Z. Tóth, J. Vág

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Periodontal inflammation is associated with morphological changes in the blood vessels which may influence the regulation of gingival blood flow (GBF). Our aim was to adapt the heat provocation test to the human gingiva to assess vascular reactivity in periodontal inflammation. Method: GBF was recorded by Laser Doppler Flowmetry before and after heat provocation in healthy volunteers (n = 50). Heat was generated either by warm saline or a halogen lamp. The latter method was also utilized for a heat test in non-smoking and smoking patients with periodontal inflammation. The circulatory parameters were correlated to the inflammatory marker, i.e. gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) production measured by Periotron. Results: Local application of heat caused a rapid, significant and transient increase in GBF regardless of the method used. The increase in the speed and not in the concentration of moving blood cells was responsible for increased GBF. Higher GCF values were correlated with increased peak flow, flux pulse amplitude and faster restoration of GBF after the test in non-smokers, but not in smokers. Conclusions: The heat test could be a valuable tool to check the vascular reactivity of gingival vessels. Moderate periodontal inflammation may facilitate gingival vascular responsiveness which can be suppressed by smoking.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)176-188
Number of pages13
JournalActa Physiologica Hungarica
Volume102
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2015

Fingerprint

Gingiva
Periodontal Diseases
Hot Temperature
Smoking
Blood Vessels
Gingival Crevicular Fluid
Inflammation
Laser-Doppler Flowmetry
Halogens
Pulse
Blood Cells
Healthy Volunteers

Keywords

  • Blood flow
  • Crevicular fluid
  • Gingivitis
  • Heat test
  • Laser doppler flowmetry
  • Periodontitis
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology (medical)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Assessment of heat provocation tests on the human gingiva : The effect of periodontal disease and smoking. / Molnár, E.; Lohinai, Zs.; Demeter, A.; Mikecs, B.; Tóth, Z.; Vág, J.

In: Acta Physiologica Hungarica, Vol. 102, No. 2, 01.06.2015, p. 176-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Molnár, E. ; Lohinai, Zs. ; Demeter, A. ; Mikecs, B. ; Tóth, Z. ; Vág, J. / Assessment of heat provocation tests on the human gingiva : The effect of periodontal disease and smoking. In: Acta Physiologica Hungarica. 2015 ; Vol. 102, No. 2. pp. 176-188.
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