Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation

Barbara Sandor, Adam Varga, Miklos Rabai, Andras Toth, Judit Papp, K. Tóth, Peter Szakaly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

International surveys have shown that the leading cause of death after kidney transplantation has cardiovascular origin with a prevalence of 35-40%. As a preventive strategy these patients receive aspirin (ASA) therapy, even though their rate of aspirin resistance is still unknown. In our study, platelet aggregation measurements were performed between 2009 and 2012 investigating the laboratory effect of low-dose aspirin (100 mg) treatment using a CARAT TX4 optical aggregometer. ASA therapy was considered clinically effective in case of low (i.e., below 40%) epinephrine-induced (10 μM) platelet aggregation index. Rate of aspirin resistance, morbidity and mortality data of kidney transplanted patients (n = 255, mean age: 49 ± 12 years) were compared to a patient population with cardio-and cerebrovascular diseases (n = 346, mean age: 52.6 ± 11 years). Rate of aspirin resistance was significantly higher in the renal transplantation group (RT) compared to the positive control group (PC) (35.9% vs. 25.6%, p <0.002). Morbidity analysis demonstrated significantly higher incidence of myocardial infarction, hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the RT group (p <0.05). The subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher incidence of infarction and stroke in the ASA resistant RT group compared to the RT patients without ASA resistance (p <0.05). Furthermore, the incidence of myocardial infarction and hypertension was significantly higher in the non-resistant RT group than in the group of PC patients without ASA resistance (p <0.05). These results may suggest that the elevated rate of aspirin resistance contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality after kidney transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)237-241
Number of pages5
JournalKorea Australia Rheology Journal
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

transplantation
kidneys
Platelets
Aspirin
Agglomeration
acetylsalicylic acid
Medical problems
myocardial infarction
hypertension
incidence
mortality
platelets
therapy
Epinephrine
epinephrine
infarction
diabetes mellitus
subgroups
strokes
death

Keywords

  • Acetylsalicylic acid
  • Aspirin resistance
  • Cardiovascular risk stratification
  • Kidney transplantation
  • Platelet aggregation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation. / Sandor, Barbara; Varga, Adam; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Andras; Papp, Judit; Tóth, K.; Szakaly, Peter.

In: Korea Australia Rheology Journal, Vol. 26, No. 2, 2014, p. 237-241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sandor, B, Varga, A, Rabai, M, Toth, A, Papp, J, Tóth, K & Szakaly, P 2014, 'Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation', Korea Australia Rheology Journal, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 237-241. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13367-014-0027-z
Sandor, Barbara ; Varga, Adam ; Rabai, Miklos ; Toth, Andras ; Papp, Judit ; Tóth, K. ; Szakaly, Peter. / Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation. In: Korea Australia Rheology Journal. 2014 ; Vol. 26, No. 2. pp. 237-241.
@article{c66e4cb7f11d4d1ea749aaf93b52a891,
title = "Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation",
abstract = "International surveys have shown that the leading cause of death after kidney transplantation has cardiovascular origin with a prevalence of 35-40{\%}. As a preventive strategy these patients receive aspirin (ASA) therapy, even though their rate of aspirin resistance is still unknown. In our study, platelet aggregation measurements were performed between 2009 and 2012 investigating the laboratory effect of low-dose aspirin (100 mg) treatment using a CARAT TX4 optical aggregometer. ASA therapy was considered clinically effective in case of low (i.e., below 40{\%}) epinephrine-induced (10 μM) platelet aggregation index. Rate of aspirin resistance, morbidity and mortality data of kidney transplanted patients (n = 255, mean age: 49 ± 12 years) were compared to a patient population with cardio-and cerebrovascular diseases (n = 346, mean age: 52.6 ± 11 years). Rate of aspirin resistance was significantly higher in the renal transplantation group (RT) compared to the positive control group (PC) (35.9{\%} vs. 25.6{\%}, p <0.002). Morbidity analysis demonstrated significantly higher incidence of myocardial infarction, hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the RT group (p <0.05). The subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher incidence of infarction and stroke in the ASA resistant RT group compared to the RT patients without ASA resistance (p <0.05). Furthermore, the incidence of myocardial infarction and hypertension was significantly higher in the non-resistant RT group than in the group of PC patients without ASA resistance (p <0.05). These results may suggest that the elevated rate of aspirin resistance contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality after kidney transplantation.",
keywords = "Acetylsalicylic acid, Aspirin resistance, Cardiovascular risk stratification, Kidney transplantation, Platelet aggregation",
author = "Barbara Sandor and Adam Varga and Miklos Rabai and Andras Toth and Judit Papp and K. T{\'o}th and Peter Szakaly",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1007/s13367-014-0027-z",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "237--241",
journal = "Korea Australia Rheology Journal",
issn = "1226-119X",
publisher = "The Korean Society of Rheology",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation

AU - Sandor, Barbara

AU - Varga, Adam

AU - Rabai, Miklos

AU - Toth, Andras

AU - Papp, Judit

AU - Tóth, K.

AU - Szakaly, Peter

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - International surveys have shown that the leading cause of death after kidney transplantation has cardiovascular origin with a prevalence of 35-40%. As a preventive strategy these patients receive aspirin (ASA) therapy, even though their rate of aspirin resistance is still unknown. In our study, platelet aggregation measurements were performed between 2009 and 2012 investigating the laboratory effect of low-dose aspirin (100 mg) treatment using a CARAT TX4 optical aggregometer. ASA therapy was considered clinically effective in case of low (i.e., below 40%) epinephrine-induced (10 μM) platelet aggregation index. Rate of aspirin resistance, morbidity and mortality data of kidney transplanted patients (n = 255, mean age: 49 ± 12 years) were compared to a patient population with cardio-and cerebrovascular diseases (n = 346, mean age: 52.6 ± 11 years). Rate of aspirin resistance was significantly higher in the renal transplantation group (RT) compared to the positive control group (PC) (35.9% vs. 25.6%, p <0.002). Morbidity analysis demonstrated significantly higher incidence of myocardial infarction, hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the RT group (p <0.05). The subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher incidence of infarction and stroke in the ASA resistant RT group compared to the RT patients without ASA resistance (p <0.05). Furthermore, the incidence of myocardial infarction and hypertension was significantly higher in the non-resistant RT group than in the group of PC patients without ASA resistance (p <0.05). These results may suggest that the elevated rate of aspirin resistance contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality after kidney transplantation.

AB - International surveys have shown that the leading cause of death after kidney transplantation has cardiovascular origin with a prevalence of 35-40%. As a preventive strategy these patients receive aspirin (ASA) therapy, even though their rate of aspirin resistance is still unknown. In our study, platelet aggregation measurements were performed between 2009 and 2012 investigating the laboratory effect of low-dose aspirin (100 mg) treatment using a CARAT TX4 optical aggregometer. ASA therapy was considered clinically effective in case of low (i.e., below 40%) epinephrine-induced (10 μM) platelet aggregation index. Rate of aspirin resistance, morbidity and mortality data of kidney transplanted patients (n = 255, mean age: 49 ± 12 years) were compared to a patient population with cardio-and cerebrovascular diseases (n = 346, mean age: 52.6 ± 11 years). Rate of aspirin resistance was significantly higher in the renal transplantation group (RT) compared to the positive control group (PC) (35.9% vs. 25.6%, p <0.002). Morbidity analysis demonstrated significantly higher incidence of myocardial infarction, hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the RT group (p <0.05). The subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher incidence of infarction and stroke in the ASA resistant RT group compared to the RT patients without ASA resistance (p <0.05). Furthermore, the incidence of myocardial infarction and hypertension was significantly higher in the non-resistant RT group than in the group of PC patients without ASA resistance (p <0.05). These results may suggest that the elevated rate of aspirin resistance contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality after kidney transplantation.

KW - Acetylsalicylic acid

KW - Aspirin resistance

KW - Cardiovascular risk stratification

KW - Kidney transplantation

KW - Platelet aggregation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84901974781&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84901974781&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s13367-014-0027-z

DO - 10.1007/s13367-014-0027-z

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84901974781

VL - 26

SP - 237

EP - 241

JO - Korea Australia Rheology Journal

JF - Korea Australia Rheology Journal

SN - 1226-119X

IS - 2

ER -