Ascorbic acid determination in pharmaceuticals by capillary electrophoresis

K. Kovács-Hadady, I. Fábián

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Numerous analytical methods are used for the determination of ascorbic acid and dehydroascorbic acid. Among these capillary electrophoretic procedures have gained significance in the last few years. Ito et al. determined ascorbic acid in biological samples and fruit juices using a fused-silica capillary at pH=8.8 (1). Chiara and Nesi (2) used a coated capillary with phosphate buffer at pH=7.0. The total ascorbic acid content of fruits was determined by first reducing the dehydroascorbic acid to ascorbic acid with D,L-homocysteine The influence of electrolyte concentration, pH and the presence of detergent on the separation of D- and L-ascorbic acid and L-galacturonic acid-1,4-lactone was studied by Van Montagu et al. (3) in details. The CE method (fused-silica capillary, borate buffer at pH=9) was compared to HPLC separation. In another paper they reported a direct CE determination of ascorbic and dehydroascorbic acid, using borate buffer (200 mM, pH=9) containing acetonitrile. The detection wavelength was 185 nm (4). Our studies directed to the determination of ascorbic and dehydroascorbic acid in pharmaceutical dosage forms, with different composition, including other vitamins, trace elements and components necessary for the preparation of effervescent tablets. For the reduction of dehydroascorbic acid homocysteine, cysteine and inorganic reducing agents were used. During the optimization of the method kinetic aspects of the oxydation/reduction processes were investigated quantitatively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)206
Number of pages1
JournalJournal de Pharmacie de Belgique
Volume53
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1998

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Capillary Electrophoresis
Dehydroascorbic Acid
Ascorbic Acid
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Buffers
Borates
Homocysteine
Silicon Dioxide
Reducing Agents
Dosage Forms
Trace Elements
Lactones
Vitamins
Detergents
Electrolytes
Tablets
Cysteine
Fruit
Phosphates
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Ascorbic acid determination in pharmaceuticals by capillary electrophoresis. / Kovács-Hadady, K.; Fábián, I.

In: Journal de Pharmacie de Belgique, Vol. 53, No. 3, 1998, p. 206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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