Are platelets activated after a rapid, one-step density gradient centrifugation? Evidence from flow cytometric analysis

Krisztina Bagamery, K. Kvell, M. Barnet, R. Landau, J. Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This procedure describes the preparation of platelets from whole blood of healthy donors and pregnancy-induced hypertensive (PIH) patients by a rapid, one-step density gradient centrifugation, and the direct immunofluorescence staining of obtained platelets (CD63). Platelets are relatively fragile structures. Consequently, for the investigation of their biochemical properties it is recommended to isolate them by a simple method that does not damage their functional parameters and induce their activation. During platelet activation, several changes occur at the platelet surface. CD63 is the receptor for a lysosomal glycoprotein expressed in activated platelets. Currently, flow cytometry (fluorescence-activated cell sorting) is the most sensitive method to detect increased surface exposure of activation antigens on the platelet surface. The present technical note describes that compared with other whole blood flow cytometric techniques, our one-step density-gradient centrifugation method using OptiPrep™ can also prevent artificial, sample manipulation-related platelet activation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-77
Number of pages3
JournalClinical and Laboratory Haematology
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2005

Fingerprint

Density Gradient Centrifugation
Centrifugation
Platelets
Blood Platelets
Chemical activation
Platelet Activation
Flow Cytometry
Direct Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Blood
Blood Donors
Flow cytometry
Glycoproteins
Sorting
Staining and Labeling
Antigens
Pregnancy
Fluorescence
Cells

Keywords

  • Density gradient centrifugation
  • Flow cytometry
  • Platelet activation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Are platelets activated after a rapid, one-step density gradient centrifugation? Evidence from flow cytometric analysis. / Bagamery, Krisztina; Kvell, K.; Barnet, M.; Landau, R.; Graham, J.

In: Clinical and Laboratory Haematology, Vol. 27, No. 1, 02.2005, p. 75-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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