Are ictal vocalisations related to the lateralisation of frontal lobe epilepsy?

J. Janszky, A. Fogarasi, H. Jokeit, A. Ebner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose was to analyse whether non-speech vocalisations in seizures originating in the frontal lobe do have lateralising value. Patients were included who had undergone presurgical evaluation with ictal video-EEG monitoring at the Epilepsy Centre, had had resective epilepsy surgery involving the frontal lobe, and who had remained seizure free > 1 year postoperatively. Twenty seven patients aged 1-42 years (mean 18) met the inclusion criteria. Age at epilepsy onset ranged from 1 month to 41 years (mean 7.1 years). All selected patients had a unilateral MRI detected lesion within the frontal lobe. Fifteen patients had right sided, 12 patients had left sided epileptogenic zones. Seizures recorded during EEG-video monitoring were re-evaluated to identify the occurrence of ictal vocalisations. Pure ictal vocalisations were distinguished from ictal sound productions due to motor or vegetative seizure activity (for example, cloni or respiratory sounds). Pure ictal vocalisation occurred in 11 patients of whom nine had a left frontal epileptogenic zone (p <0.01). It is concluded that ictal vocalisation could be an additional lateralising sign in frontal lobe epilepsy. The results suggest that not only speech, but vocalisation at a subverbal level also shows a left hemispheric dominance in humans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)244-247
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
Volume69
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2000

Fingerprint

Frontal Lobe Epilepsy
Stroke
Seizures
Frontal Lobe
Epilepsy
Electroencephalography
Respiratory Sounds
Patient Rights
Age of Onset

Keywords

  • Frontal lobe epilepsy
  • Hemispheric lateralisation
  • Vocalisation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Are ictal vocalisations related to the lateralisation of frontal lobe epilepsy? / Janszky, J.; Fogarasi, A.; Jokeit, H.; Ebner, A.

In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, Vol. 69, No. 2, 08.2000, p. 244-247.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{977c827fff004525827d1d0fd113ff7e,
title = "Are ictal vocalisations related to the lateralisation of frontal lobe epilepsy?",
abstract = "The purpose was to analyse whether non-speech vocalisations in seizures originating in the frontal lobe do have lateralising value. Patients were included who had undergone presurgical evaluation with ictal video-EEG monitoring at the Epilepsy Centre, had had resective epilepsy surgery involving the frontal lobe, and who had remained seizure free > 1 year postoperatively. Twenty seven patients aged 1-42 years (mean 18) met the inclusion criteria. Age at epilepsy onset ranged from 1 month to 41 years (mean 7.1 years). All selected patients had a unilateral MRI detected lesion within the frontal lobe. Fifteen patients had right sided, 12 patients had left sided epileptogenic zones. Seizures recorded during EEG-video monitoring were re-evaluated to identify the occurrence of ictal vocalisations. Pure ictal vocalisations were distinguished from ictal sound productions due to motor or vegetative seizure activity (for example, cloni or respiratory sounds). Pure ictal vocalisation occurred in 11 patients of whom nine had a left frontal epileptogenic zone (p <0.01). It is concluded that ictal vocalisation could be an additional lateralising sign in frontal lobe epilepsy. The results suggest that not only speech, but vocalisation at a subverbal level also shows a left hemispheric dominance in humans.",
keywords = "Frontal lobe epilepsy, Hemispheric lateralisation, Vocalisation",
author = "J. Janszky and A. Fogarasi and H. Jokeit and A. Ebner",
year = "2000",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1136/jnnp.69.2.244",
language = "English",
volume = "69",
pages = "244--247",
journal = "Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry",
issn = "0022-3050",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are ictal vocalisations related to the lateralisation of frontal lobe epilepsy?

AU - Janszky, J.

AU - Fogarasi, A.

AU - Jokeit, H.

AU - Ebner, A.

PY - 2000/8

Y1 - 2000/8

N2 - The purpose was to analyse whether non-speech vocalisations in seizures originating in the frontal lobe do have lateralising value. Patients were included who had undergone presurgical evaluation with ictal video-EEG monitoring at the Epilepsy Centre, had had resective epilepsy surgery involving the frontal lobe, and who had remained seizure free > 1 year postoperatively. Twenty seven patients aged 1-42 years (mean 18) met the inclusion criteria. Age at epilepsy onset ranged from 1 month to 41 years (mean 7.1 years). All selected patients had a unilateral MRI detected lesion within the frontal lobe. Fifteen patients had right sided, 12 patients had left sided epileptogenic zones. Seizures recorded during EEG-video monitoring were re-evaluated to identify the occurrence of ictal vocalisations. Pure ictal vocalisations were distinguished from ictal sound productions due to motor or vegetative seizure activity (for example, cloni or respiratory sounds). Pure ictal vocalisation occurred in 11 patients of whom nine had a left frontal epileptogenic zone (p <0.01). It is concluded that ictal vocalisation could be an additional lateralising sign in frontal lobe epilepsy. The results suggest that not only speech, but vocalisation at a subverbal level also shows a left hemispheric dominance in humans.

AB - The purpose was to analyse whether non-speech vocalisations in seizures originating in the frontal lobe do have lateralising value. Patients were included who had undergone presurgical evaluation with ictal video-EEG monitoring at the Epilepsy Centre, had had resective epilepsy surgery involving the frontal lobe, and who had remained seizure free > 1 year postoperatively. Twenty seven patients aged 1-42 years (mean 18) met the inclusion criteria. Age at epilepsy onset ranged from 1 month to 41 years (mean 7.1 years). All selected patients had a unilateral MRI detected lesion within the frontal lobe. Fifteen patients had right sided, 12 patients had left sided epileptogenic zones. Seizures recorded during EEG-video monitoring were re-evaluated to identify the occurrence of ictal vocalisations. Pure ictal vocalisations were distinguished from ictal sound productions due to motor or vegetative seizure activity (for example, cloni or respiratory sounds). Pure ictal vocalisation occurred in 11 patients of whom nine had a left frontal epileptogenic zone (p <0.01). It is concluded that ictal vocalisation could be an additional lateralising sign in frontal lobe epilepsy. The results suggest that not only speech, but vocalisation at a subverbal level also shows a left hemispheric dominance in humans.

KW - Frontal lobe epilepsy

KW - Hemispheric lateralisation

KW - Vocalisation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033910360&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033910360&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/jnnp.69.2.244

DO - 10.1136/jnnp.69.2.244

M3 - Article

C2 - 10896702

AN - SCOPUS:0033910360

VL - 69

SP - 244

EP - 247

JO - Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry

JF - Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry

SN - 0022-3050

IS - 2

ER -