Aqueous potassium bicarbonate/carbonate ionic equilibria at elevated pressures and temperatures

Maider Legarra, Ashley Blitz, Z. Czégény, Michael Jerry Antal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aqueous bicarbonate/carbonate ionic equilibria play an important role in determining the practicality of various aqueous-alkaline fuel cells and the hot carbonate process for removing carbon dioxide from synthesis gas streams. These equilibria are also of interest to scientists concerned with climate change. In this article, we report measurements of aqueous bicarbonate/carbonate ionic equilibria between 150 and 320 C at the solutions' respective saturation pressures. The aqueous bicarbonate ions are not stable at temperatures above 150 C: the bicarbonate decomposes into carbonate and aqueous CO2. The dissolved CO2 is released from the solution when the reaction vessel is quickly cooled and depressurized, leaving behind stable carbonate ions in a solution with increased pH. A thermodynamic analysis of these findings indicates that the spontaneous and endothermic bicarbonate decomposition reaction proceeds with a positive change in entropy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13241-13251
Number of pages11
JournalIndustrial and Engineering Chemistry Research
Volume52
Issue number37
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 18 2013

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Carbonates
Bicarbonates
Potassium
Temperature
Alkaline fuel cells
Saturation (materials composition)
Synthesis gas
Ions
Carbon Dioxide
Climate change
Carbon dioxide
Entropy
potassium bicarbonate
Thermodynamics
Decomposition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Aqueous potassium bicarbonate/carbonate ionic equilibria at elevated pressures and temperatures. / Legarra, Maider; Blitz, Ashley; Czégény, Z.; Antal, Michael Jerry.

In: Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research, Vol. 52, No. 37, 18.09.2013, p. 13241-13251.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Legarra, Maider ; Blitz, Ashley ; Czégény, Z. ; Antal, Michael Jerry. / Aqueous potassium bicarbonate/carbonate ionic equilibria at elevated pressures and temperatures. In: Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research. 2013 ; Vol. 52, No. 37. pp. 13241-13251.
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