Approach and follow behaviour - Possible indicators of the human-horse relationship

Katalin Maros, Barbara Boross, E. Kubinyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of our study was to analyze the behavioural responses of horses (N = 51) to familiar humans and to find factors that may affect these responses in three tests: (1) approach to, (2) standing beside, and (3) following the familiar person. We investigated the impacts of horse-related factors (gender and age) and human-related factors (type of work, housing management, amount of handling, number of handlers and training to follow). Horses with one handler needed less time to approach the human than horses with more handlers. Standing beside the human correlated positively with following. Following was mainly affected by training. According to our results, the number of handlers has an important effect on horses' responses to familiar humans, especially regarding approach and follow behaviour. However, following behaviour is fundamentally determined by training.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)410-427
Number of pages18
JournalInteraction Studies
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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horses
housing
human being
gender
management
Horse
testing
time

Keywords

  • Approach
  • Follow
  • Human-horse interaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Approach and follow behaviour - Possible indicators of the human-horse relationship. / Maros, Katalin; Boross, Barbara; Kubinyi, E.

In: Interaction Studies, Vol. 11, No. 3, 2010, p. 410-427.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maros, Katalin ; Boross, Barbara ; Kubinyi, E. / Approach and follow behaviour - Possible indicators of the human-horse relationship. In: Interaction Studies. 2010 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 410-427.
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