Anxiolytic effects of repeated victory in male wistar rats

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recurring evidence suggests that social stress has anxiogenic-like effects in laboratory rodents. However, despite the fact that competitive situations are stressful, success in competitive situations reduces anxiety in humans. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether repeated experience of winning in aggressive encounters affects anxiety measures in laboratory rodents. Male rats were housed together with a female for 2 weeks. Cohabitation with females was necessary to induce high levels of aggressiveness in these animals. During the second week, half of the male rats were exposed daily for 30 min to an intruder of smaller size, and the other half remained undisturbed in their home cage. Group-housed male rats were also used as controls. Residents attacked and defeated intruders, who did not retaliate. After the fifth encounter, all animals were tested for anxiety on the elevated plus-maze. Repeated victory lowered anxiety measures considerably, despite the fact that aggressive encounters are stressful even for the victor. It is concluded that repeated victory has an anxiolytic action in male rats. The similarities with human data suggest that repeated winning in rats can be used as a laboratory model for success-induced changes in human anxiety. Aggr. Behav. 26:257-261, 2000.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)257-261
Number of pages5
JournalAggressive Behavior
Volume26
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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Anti-Anxiety Agents
Wistar Rats
Anxiety
Rodentia
Rat
Victory
Rodent
Animals

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Anxiety
  • Plus-maze
  • Rat
  • Stress
  • Victory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Anxiolytic effects of repeated victory in male wistar rats. / Haller, J.; Halász, J.

In: Aggressive Behavior, Vol. 26, No. 3, 2000, p. 257-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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