Antiplatelet effect of acetylsalicylic acid, metamizole and their combination-in vitro and in vivo comparisons

J. Papp, B. Sandor, Z. Vamos, D. Botor, A. Tóth, M. Rabai, P. Kenyeres, P. Cseplo, I. Juricskay, E. Mezősi, A. Koller, K. Tóth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) plays an important role in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Metamizole (MET) is an analgesic and antipyretic medicine, it is not used as an antiplatelet drug. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to examine the antiplatelet effect of MET and the possible interactions between the drugs. METHODS: In our in vitro investigations different concentrations of ASA and MET solutions were added to blood. To examine the interactions MET and ASA were added together. In our in vivo crossover study intravenous MET, oral ASA or both drugs together were administered. Epinephrine and adenosine-diphosphate induced platelet aggregation was determined by optical aggregometry. RESULTS: Epinephrine-induced aggregation was completely inhibited in all ASA and MET concentrations in vitro. Lower, ineffective concentration of MET prevented the antiplatelet effect of ASA. The inhibition was completely restored when higher concentration of ASA was used or when ASA was added first. Our in vivo study showed that in the MET group rapid onset of inhibition was developed and there was no inhibition after one day. In the ASA group platelet aggregation decreased slowly but still had significant inhibitory effect after 72 hours. Combined therapy showed similar changes to the MET group. CONCLUSION: Antiplatelet effect of MET and ASA did not differ significantly in vitro. The observations may indicate a competitive interaction between the two drugs. The in vivo experiments showed that intravenously administered MET is an effective antiplatelet drug and can be considered as a therapeutic alternative, when ASA cannot be used in oral form.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalClinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Dipyrone
Aspirin
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
Platelet Aggregation
Epinephrine
In Vitro Techniques
Antipyretics
Drug Interactions
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Cross-Over Studies
Adenosine Diphosphate
Analgesics
Cardiovascular Diseases

Keywords

  • Acetylsalicylic acid
  • Acute coronary syndrome
  • Antiplatelet effect
  • Metamizole
  • Platelet aggregation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Antiplatelet effect of acetylsalicylic acid, metamizole and their combination-in vitro and in vivo comparisons. / Papp, J.; Sandor, B.; Vamos, Z.; Botor, D.; Tóth, A.; Rabai, M.; Kenyeres, P.; Cseplo, P.; Juricskay, I.; Mezősi, E.; Koller, A.; Tóth, K.

In: Clinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation, Vol. 56, No. 1, 2014, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Papp, J. ; Sandor, B. ; Vamos, Z. ; Botor, D. ; Tóth, A. ; Rabai, M. ; Kenyeres, P. ; Cseplo, P. ; Juricskay, I. ; Mezősi, E. ; Koller, A. ; Tóth, K. / Antiplatelet effect of acetylsalicylic acid, metamizole and their combination-in vitro and in vivo comparisons. In: Clinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation. 2014 ; Vol. 56, No. 1. pp. 1-12.
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AU - Sandor, B.

AU - Vamos, Z.

AU - Botor, D.

AU - Tóth, A.

AU - Rabai, M.

AU - Kenyeres, P.

AU - Cseplo, P.

AU - Juricskay, I.

AU - Mezősi, E.

AU - Koller, A.

AU - Tóth, K.

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) plays an important role in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Metamizole (MET) is an analgesic and antipyretic medicine, it is not used as an antiplatelet drug. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to examine the antiplatelet effect of MET and the possible interactions between the drugs. METHODS: In our in vitro investigations different concentrations of ASA and MET solutions were added to blood. To examine the interactions MET and ASA were added together. In our in vivo crossover study intravenous MET, oral ASA or both drugs together were administered. Epinephrine and adenosine-diphosphate induced platelet aggregation was determined by optical aggregometry. RESULTS: Epinephrine-induced aggregation was completely inhibited in all ASA and MET concentrations in vitro. Lower, ineffective concentration of MET prevented the antiplatelet effect of ASA. The inhibition was completely restored when higher concentration of ASA was used or when ASA was added first. Our in vivo study showed that in the MET group rapid onset of inhibition was developed and there was no inhibition after one day. In the ASA group platelet aggregation decreased slowly but still had significant inhibitory effect after 72 hours. Combined therapy showed similar changes to the MET group. CONCLUSION: Antiplatelet effect of MET and ASA did not differ significantly in vitro. The observations may indicate a competitive interaction between the two drugs. The in vivo experiments showed that intravenously administered MET is an effective antiplatelet drug and can be considered as a therapeutic alternative, when ASA cannot be used in oral form.

AB - BACKGROUND: Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) plays an important role in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Metamizole (MET) is an analgesic and antipyretic medicine, it is not used as an antiplatelet drug. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to examine the antiplatelet effect of MET and the possible interactions between the drugs. METHODS: In our in vitro investigations different concentrations of ASA and MET solutions were added to blood. To examine the interactions MET and ASA were added together. In our in vivo crossover study intravenous MET, oral ASA or both drugs together were administered. Epinephrine and adenosine-diphosphate induced platelet aggregation was determined by optical aggregometry. RESULTS: Epinephrine-induced aggregation was completely inhibited in all ASA and MET concentrations in vitro. Lower, ineffective concentration of MET prevented the antiplatelet effect of ASA. The inhibition was completely restored when higher concentration of ASA was used or when ASA was added first. Our in vivo study showed that in the MET group rapid onset of inhibition was developed and there was no inhibition after one day. In the ASA group platelet aggregation decreased slowly but still had significant inhibitory effect after 72 hours. Combined therapy showed similar changes to the MET group. CONCLUSION: Antiplatelet effect of MET and ASA did not differ significantly in vitro. The observations may indicate a competitive interaction between the two drugs. The in vivo experiments showed that intravenously administered MET is an effective antiplatelet drug and can be considered as a therapeutic alternative, when ASA cannot be used in oral form.

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