Antimicrobial resistance in urosepsis: outcomes from the multinational, multicenter global prevalence of infections in urology (GPIU) study 2003–2013

Zafer Tandoğdu, Ricardo Bartoletti, Tomasso Cai, Mete Çek, Magnus Grabe, Ekaterina Kulchavenya, Bela Köves, Vandana Menon, Kurt Naber, Tamara Perepanova, P. Tenke, Björn Wullt, Truls Erik Bjerklund Johansen, Florian Wagenlehner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Primary objective was to identify the (1) relationship of clinical severity of urosepsis with the pathogen spectrum and resistance and (2) appropriateness of using the pathogen spectrum and resistance rates of health-care-associated urinary tract infections (HAUTI) as representative of urosepsis. The secondary objective was to provide an overview of the pathogens and their resistance profile in patients with urosepsis. Population and Methods: A point prevalence study carried out in 70 countries (2003–2013). Population studied included; 408 individuals with microbiologically proven urosepsis, 1606 individuals with microbiological proof of HAUTI and 27,542 individuals hospitalised in urology wards. Main outcomes are pathogens and resistance identified in HAUTIs and urosepsis including its clinical severity. A statistical model that included demographic factors (study year, geographical location, hospital setting) was used for analysis. Results: Amongst urology practices, the prevalence of microbiologically proven HAUTI and urosepsis was 5.8 and 1.5 %, respectively. Frequent pathogens in urosepsis were E. coli (43 %), Enterococcus spp. (11 %), P. aeruginosa (10 %) and Klebsiella spp. (10 %). Resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics was high and rates ranged from 8 % (imipenem) to 62 % (aminopenicillin/β lactamase inhibitors); 45 % of Enterobacteriaceae and 21 % of P. aeruginosa were multidrug-resistant. Resistance rates in urosepsis were higher than in other clinical diagnosis of HAUTI (Likelihood ratio

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalWorld Journal of Urology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Dec 11 2015

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Urology
Cross Infection
Urinary Tract Infections
Infection
Klebsiella
Imipenem
Enterococcus
Statistical Models
Enterobacteriaceae
Population
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Escherichia coli
Anti-Bacterial Agents

Keywords

  • Pathogens
  • Prevalence
  • Resistance
  • Urosepsis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Antimicrobial resistance in urosepsis : outcomes from the multinational, multicenter global prevalence of infections in urology (GPIU) study 2003–2013. / Tandoğdu, Zafer; Bartoletti, Ricardo; Cai, Tomasso; Çek, Mete; Grabe, Magnus; Kulchavenya, Ekaterina; Köves, Bela; Menon, Vandana; Naber, Kurt; Perepanova, Tamara; Tenke, P.; Wullt, Björn; Johansen, Truls Erik Bjerklund; Wagenlehner, Florian.

In: World Journal of Urology, 11.12.2015, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tandoğdu, Z, Bartoletti, R, Cai, T, Çek, M, Grabe, M, Kulchavenya, E, Köves, B, Menon, V, Naber, K, Perepanova, T, Tenke, P, Wullt, B, Johansen, TEB & Wagenlehner, F 2015, 'Antimicrobial resistance in urosepsis: outcomes from the multinational, multicenter global prevalence of infections in urology (GPIU) study 2003–2013', World Journal of Urology, pp. 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00345-015-1722-1
Tandoğdu, Zafer ; Bartoletti, Ricardo ; Cai, Tomasso ; Çek, Mete ; Grabe, Magnus ; Kulchavenya, Ekaterina ; Köves, Bela ; Menon, Vandana ; Naber, Kurt ; Perepanova, Tamara ; Tenke, P. ; Wullt, Björn ; Johansen, Truls Erik Bjerklund ; Wagenlehner, Florian. / Antimicrobial resistance in urosepsis : outcomes from the multinational, multicenter global prevalence of infections in urology (GPIU) study 2003–2013. In: World Journal of Urology. 2015 ; pp. 1-8.
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abstract = "Objective: Primary objective was to identify the (1) relationship of clinical severity of urosepsis with the pathogen spectrum and resistance and (2) appropriateness of using the pathogen spectrum and resistance rates of health-care-associated urinary tract infections (HAUTI) as representative of urosepsis. The secondary objective was to provide an overview of the pathogens and their resistance profile in patients with urosepsis. Population and Methods: A point prevalence study carried out in 70 countries (2003–2013). Population studied included; 408 individuals with microbiologically proven urosepsis, 1606 individuals with microbiological proof of HAUTI and 27,542 individuals hospitalised in urology wards. Main outcomes are pathogens and resistance identified in HAUTIs and urosepsis including its clinical severity. A statistical model that included demographic factors (study year, geographical location, hospital setting) was used for analysis. Results: Amongst urology practices, the prevalence of microbiologically proven HAUTI and urosepsis was 5.8 and 1.5 {\%}, respectively. Frequent pathogens in urosepsis were E. coli (43 {\%}), Enterococcus spp. (11 {\%}), P. aeruginosa (10 {\%}) and Klebsiella spp. (10 {\%}). Resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics was high and rates ranged from 8 {\%} (imipenem) to 62 {\%} (aminopenicillin/β lactamase inhibitors); 45 {\%} of Enterobacteriaceae and 21 {\%} of P. aeruginosa were multidrug-resistant. Resistance rates in urosepsis were higher than in other clinical diagnosis of HAUTI (Likelihood ratio",
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AU - Cai, Tomasso

AU - Çek, Mete

AU - Grabe, Magnus

AU - Kulchavenya, Ekaterina

AU - Köves, Bela

AU - Menon, Vandana

AU - Naber, Kurt

AU - Perepanova, Tamara

AU - Tenke, P.

AU - Wullt, Björn

AU - Johansen, Truls Erik Bjerklund

AU - Wagenlehner, Florian

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