Antigen-specific adherence of antibody-producing hybridoma cells

Application to neural and nonneural antigens

J. Najbauer, G. J. Tigyi, P. Németh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Antibody-producing hybridoma cells specifically bind to microgram quantities of antigen molecules adsorbed onto the surface of plastic microtiter plates. The binding of hybridoma cells to nonantigen is optimally below 5%, similar binding of non-antibody-producing cells is 4-7%, compared to the binding of the hybridomas to their antigen. There is a difference in the kinetics of binding hybridomas to antigen compared to nonantigen. The number of bound cells depends on the amount, i.e., the surface density, of the antigen molecules and shows typical saturation effects. Preincubation of hybridomas with excess free antigen and saturation of the antibody binding site on the surface with the hybridoma-produced antibody reduces binding of the hybridoma cells to the antigen. Treatment of cells with trrypsin reduces binding to antigen-coated plastic surfaces. Drugs such as sodium azide, cytochalasin B, colchicine, vinpocetine, and vincristine sulfate reduce binding to the antigen. Hybridoma cells adhering to the antigen produce more antibody than nonadhering cells. The results reported in this paper show that antigen molecules adsorbed to include a plastic surface and hybridoma cells interact specifically. This system forms a suitable model to study the interaction of antigen with antige-specific cells and may be useful as a separation method for specific antibody-producing cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)415-426
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Research
Volume15
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1986

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Antibody-Producing Cells
Hybridomas
Antigens
Plastics
vinpocetine
Antibody Binding Sites
Sodium Azide
Cytochalasin B
Antibodies
Colchicine
Vincristine
Surface Antigens
Cell Count

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Antigen-specific adherence of antibody-producing hybridoma cells : Application to neural and nonneural antigens. / Najbauer, J.; Tigyi, G. J.; Németh, P.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Research, Vol. 15, No. 3, 1986, p. 415-426.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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