Antiepileptic drug use, folic acid supplementation, and congenital abnormalities: A population-based case-control study

D. Kjær, E. Puhó, J. Christensen, M. Vestergaard, E. Czeizel, H. T. Sørensen, J. Olsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate whether folic acid supplementation in early pregnancy modifies the association between the prevalence of congenital abnormalities in the offspring and maternal use of carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital (PB), phenytoin (PHT), and primidone (PRI). Design: A population-based case-control study. Setting: The Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities (HCCSCA) (1980-1996) and its information on children from the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry and the Hungarian National Birth Registry. Population: Children with congenital abnormalities (cases; n = 20 792, of whom 148 had been exposed to antiepileptic drugs [AEDs]) and unaffected children (controls; n = 38 151, of whom 184 had been exposed to AEDs). Methods: Information on drug exposure and background variables for the mothers were collected from antenatal logbooks, discharge summaries, and structured questionnaires completed by the mothers at the time of HCCSCA registration. Main outcome measures: Congenital abnormalities detected at termination of pregnancy, at birth or until 3 months of age according to CBZ, PB, PHT, or PRI exposure at 5-12 weeks from first day of the last menstrual period (LMP), stratified by folic acid supplementation. Results: Compared with children unexposed to AEDs and folic acid, the odds ratio of congenital abnormalities was 1.47 (95% CI 1.13-1.90) in children exposed to AEDs without folic acid supplementation and 1.27 (95% CI 0.85-1.89) for children exposed to AEDs with folic acid supplementation. Conclusion: The results indicate that the risk of congenital abnormalities in children exposed in utero to CBZ, PB, PHT, and PRI is reduced but not eliminated by folic acid supplementation at 5-12 weeks from LMP. The statistical precision in our study is limited due to rarity of the exposures, and further studies are needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)98-103
Number of pages6
JournalBJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Volume115
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2008

Fingerprint

Folic Acid
Anticonvulsants
Case-Control Studies
Primidone
Population
Carbamazepine
Phenytoin
Phenobarbital
Mothers
Registries
Parturition
Pregnancy
Odds Ratio
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Anticonvulsants
  • Congenital abnormalities
  • Epidemiological studies
  • Folic acid
  • Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

Antiepileptic drug use, folic acid supplementation, and congenital abnormalities : A population-based case-control study. / Kjær, D.; Puhó, E.; Christensen, J.; Vestergaard, M.; Czeizel, E.; Sørensen, H. T.; Olsen, J.

In: BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Vol. 115, No. 1, 01.2008, p. 98-103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To investigate whether folic acid supplementation in early pregnancy modifies the association between the prevalence of congenital abnormalities in the offspring and maternal use of carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital (PB), phenytoin (PHT), and primidone (PRI). Design: A population-based case-control study. Setting: The Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities (HCCSCA) (1980-1996) and its information on children from the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry and the Hungarian National Birth Registry. Population: Children with congenital abnormalities (cases; n = 20 792, of whom 148 had been exposed to antiepileptic drugs [AEDs]) and unaffected children (controls; n = 38 151, of whom 184 had been exposed to AEDs). Methods: Information on drug exposure and background variables for the mothers were collected from antenatal logbooks, discharge summaries, and structured questionnaires completed by the mothers at the time of HCCSCA registration. Main outcome measures: Congenital abnormalities detected at termination of pregnancy, at birth or until 3 months of age according to CBZ, PB, PHT, or PRI exposure at 5-12 weeks from first day of the last menstrual period (LMP), stratified by folic acid supplementation. Results: Compared with children unexposed to AEDs and folic acid, the odds ratio of congenital abnormalities was 1.47 (95{\%} CI 1.13-1.90) in children exposed to AEDs without folic acid supplementation and 1.27 (95{\%} CI 0.85-1.89) for children exposed to AEDs with folic acid supplementation. Conclusion: The results indicate that the risk of congenital abnormalities in children exposed in utero to CBZ, PB, PHT, and PRI is reduced but not eliminated by folic acid supplementation at 5-12 weeks from LMP. The statistical precision in our study is limited due to rarity of the exposures, and further studies are needed.",
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AU - Vestergaard, M.

AU - Czeizel, E.

AU - Sørensen, H. T.

AU - Olsen, J.

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AB - Objective: To investigate whether folic acid supplementation in early pregnancy modifies the association between the prevalence of congenital abnormalities in the offspring and maternal use of carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital (PB), phenytoin (PHT), and primidone (PRI). Design: A population-based case-control study. Setting: The Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities (HCCSCA) (1980-1996) and its information on children from the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry and the Hungarian National Birth Registry. Population: Children with congenital abnormalities (cases; n = 20 792, of whom 148 had been exposed to antiepileptic drugs [AEDs]) and unaffected children (controls; n = 38 151, of whom 184 had been exposed to AEDs). Methods: Information on drug exposure and background variables for the mothers were collected from antenatal logbooks, discharge summaries, and structured questionnaires completed by the mothers at the time of HCCSCA registration. Main outcome measures: Congenital abnormalities detected at termination of pregnancy, at birth or until 3 months of age according to CBZ, PB, PHT, or PRI exposure at 5-12 weeks from first day of the last menstrual period (LMP), stratified by folic acid supplementation. Results: Compared with children unexposed to AEDs and folic acid, the odds ratio of congenital abnormalities was 1.47 (95% CI 1.13-1.90) in children exposed to AEDs without folic acid supplementation and 1.27 (95% CI 0.85-1.89) for children exposed to AEDs with folic acid supplementation. Conclusion: The results indicate that the risk of congenital abnormalities in children exposed in utero to CBZ, PB, PHT, and PRI is reduced but not eliminated by folic acid supplementation at 5-12 weeks from LMP. The statistical precision in our study is limited due to rarity of the exposures, and further studies are needed.

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