Anisotropic organization and microscopic manipulation of self-assembling synthetic porphyrin microrods that mimic chlorosomes: Bacterial light-harvesting systems

Cyril Chappaz-Gillot, Peter L. Marek, Bruno J. Blaive, Gabriel Canard, Jochen Bürck, G. Garab, Horst Hahn, Tamás Jávorfi, L. Kelemen, Ralph Krupke, Dennis Mössinger, P. Ormos, Chilla Malla Reddy, Christian Roussel, Gábor Steinbach, Milán Szabó, Anne S. Ulrich, Nicolas Vanthuyne, Aravind Vijayaraghavan, Anita ZupcanovaTeodor Silviu Balaban

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Being able to control in time and space the positioning, orientation, movement, and sense of rotation of nano- to microscale objects is currently an active research area in nanoscience, having diverse nanotechnological applications. In this paper, we demonstrate unprecedented control and maneuvering of rod-shaped or tubular nanostructures with high aspect ratios which are formed by self-assembling synthetic porphyrins. The self-assembly algorithm, encoded by appended chemical-recognition groups on the periphery of these porphyrins, is the same as the one operating for chlorosomal bacteriochlorophylls (BChl's). Chlorosomes, rod-shaped organelles with relatively long-range molecular order, are the most efficient naturally occurring light-harvesting systems.(1, 2) They are used by green photosynthetic bacteria to trap visible and infrared light of minute intensities even at great depths, e.g., 100 m below water surface or in volcanic vents in the absence of solar radiation. In contrast to most other natural light-harvesting systems, the chlorosomal antennae are devoid of a protein scaffold to orient the BChl's; thus, they are an attractive goal for mimicry by synthetic chemists, who are able to engineer more robust chromophores to self-assemble. Functional devices with environmentally friendly chromophores-which should be able to act as photosensitizers within hybrid solar cells, leading to high photon-to-current conversion efficiencies even under low illumination conditions-have yet to be fabricated. The orderly manner in which the BChl's and their synthetic counterparts self-assemble imparts strong diamagnetic and optical anisotropies and flow/shear characteristics to their nanostructured assemblies, allowing them to be manipulated by electrical, magnetic, or tribomechanical forces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)944-954
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume134
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 18 2012

Fingerprint

Bacteriochlorophylls
Porphyrins
Chromophores
Light
Nanoscience
Optical anisotropy
Photosensitizing Agents
Photosensitizers
Nanostructures
Hybrid Cells
Optical flows
Vents
Anisotropy
Scaffolds (biology)
Solar radiation
Lighting
Photons
Scaffolds
Organelles
Self assembly

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Catalysis
  • Biochemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

Anisotropic organization and microscopic manipulation of self-assembling synthetic porphyrin microrods that mimic chlorosomes : Bacterial light-harvesting systems. / Chappaz-Gillot, Cyril; Marek, Peter L.; Blaive, Bruno J.; Canard, Gabriel; Bürck, Jochen; Garab, G.; Hahn, Horst; Jávorfi, Tamás; Kelemen, L.; Krupke, Ralph; Mössinger, Dennis; Ormos, P.; Reddy, Chilla Malla; Roussel, Christian; Steinbach, Gábor; Szabó, Milán; Ulrich, Anne S.; Vanthuyne, Nicolas; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Zupcanova, Anita; Balaban, Teodor Silviu.

In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 134, No. 2, 18.01.2012, p. 944-954.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chappaz-Gillot, C, Marek, PL, Blaive, BJ, Canard, G, Bürck, J, Garab, G, Hahn, H, Jávorfi, T, Kelemen, L, Krupke, R, Mössinger, D, Ormos, P, Reddy, CM, Roussel, C, Steinbach, G, Szabó, M, Ulrich, AS, Vanthuyne, N, Vijayaraghavan, A, Zupcanova, A & Balaban, TS 2012, 'Anisotropic organization and microscopic manipulation of self-assembling synthetic porphyrin microrods that mimic chlorosomes: Bacterial light-harvesting systems', Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 134, no. 2, pp. 944-954. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja203838p
Chappaz-Gillot, Cyril ; Marek, Peter L. ; Blaive, Bruno J. ; Canard, Gabriel ; Bürck, Jochen ; Garab, G. ; Hahn, Horst ; Jávorfi, Tamás ; Kelemen, L. ; Krupke, Ralph ; Mössinger, Dennis ; Ormos, P. ; Reddy, Chilla Malla ; Roussel, Christian ; Steinbach, Gábor ; Szabó, Milán ; Ulrich, Anne S. ; Vanthuyne, Nicolas ; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind ; Zupcanova, Anita ; Balaban, Teodor Silviu. / Anisotropic organization and microscopic manipulation of self-assembling synthetic porphyrin microrods that mimic chlorosomes : Bacterial light-harvesting systems. In: Journal of the American Chemical Society. 2012 ; Vol. 134, No. 2. pp. 944-954.
@article{e5566393b35540dfad3f3e8f0f3b6e69,
title = "Anisotropic organization and microscopic manipulation of self-assembling synthetic porphyrin microrods that mimic chlorosomes: Bacterial light-harvesting systems",
abstract = "Being able to control in time and space the positioning, orientation, movement, and sense of rotation of nano- to microscale objects is currently an active research area in nanoscience, having diverse nanotechnological applications. In this paper, we demonstrate unprecedented control and maneuvering of rod-shaped or tubular nanostructures with high aspect ratios which are formed by self-assembling synthetic porphyrins. The self-assembly algorithm, encoded by appended chemical-recognition groups on the periphery of these porphyrins, is the same as the one operating for chlorosomal bacteriochlorophylls (BChl's). Chlorosomes, rod-shaped organelles with relatively long-range molecular order, are the most efficient naturally occurring light-harvesting systems.(1, 2) They are used by green photosynthetic bacteria to trap visible and infrared light of minute intensities even at great depths, e.g., 100 m below water surface or in volcanic vents in the absence of solar radiation. In contrast to most other natural light-harvesting systems, the chlorosomal antennae are devoid of a protein scaffold to orient the BChl's; thus, they are an attractive goal for mimicry by synthetic chemists, who are able to engineer more robust chromophores to self-assemble. Functional devices with environmentally friendly chromophores-which should be able to act as photosensitizers within hybrid solar cells, leading to high photon-to-current conversion efficiencies even under low illumination conditions-have yet to be fabricated. The orderly manner in which the BChl's and their synthetic counterparts self-assemble imparts strong diamagnetic and optical anisotropies and flow/shear characteristics to their nanostructured assemblies, allowing them to be manipulated by electrical, magnetic, or tribomechanical forces.",
author = "Cyril Chappaz-Gillot and Marek, {Peter L.} and Blaive, {Bruno J.} and Gabriel Canard and Jochen B{\"u}rck and G. Garab and Horst Hahn and Tam{\'a}s J{\'a}vorfi and L. Kelemen and Ralph Krupke and Dennis M{\"o}ssinger and P. Ormos and Reddy, {Chilla Malla} and Christian Roussel and G{\'a}bor Steinbach and Mil{\'a}n Szab{\'o} and Ulrich, {Anne S.} and Nicolas Vanthuyne and Aravind Vijayaraghavan and Anita Zupcanova and Balaban, {Teodor Silviu}",
year = "2012",
month = "1",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1021/ja203838p",
language = "English",
volume = "134",
pages = "944--954",
journal = "Journal of the American Chemical Society",
issn = "0002-7863",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Anisotropic organization and microscopic manipulation of self-assembling synthetic porphyrin microrods that mimic chlorosomes

T2 - Bacterial light-harvesting systems

AU - Chappaz-Gillot, Cyril

AU - Marek, Peter L.

AU - Blaive, Bruno J.

AU - Canard, Gabriel

AU - Bürck, Jochen

AU - Garab, G.

AU - Hahn, Horst

AU - Jávorfi, Tamás

AU - Kelemen, L.

AU - Krupke, Ralph

AU - Mössinger, Dennis

AU - Ormos, P.

AU - Reddy, Chilla Malla

AU - Roussel, Christian

AU - Steinbach, Gábor

AU - Szabó, Milán

AU - Ulrich, Anne S.

AU - Vanthuyne, Nicolas

AU - Vijayaraghavan, Aravind

AU - Zupcanova, Anita

AU - Balaban, Teodor Silviu

PY - 2012/1/18

Y1 - 2012/1/18

N2 - Being able to control in time and space the positioning, orientation, movement, and sense of rotation of nano- to microscale objects is currently an active research area in nanoscience, having diverse nanotechnological applications. In this paper, we demonstrate unprecedented control and maneuvering of rod-shaped or tubular nanostructures with high aspect ratios which are formed by self-assembling synthetic porphyrins. The self-assembly algorithm, encoded by appended chemical-recognition groups on the periphery of these porphyrins, is the same as the one operating for chlorosomal bacteriochlorophylls (BChl's). Chlorosomes, rod-shaped organelles with relatively long-range molecular order, are the most efficient naturally occurring light-harvesting systems.(1, 2) They are used by green photosynthetic bacteria to trap visible and infrared light of minute intensities even at great depths, e.g., 100 m below water surface or in volcanic vents in the absence of solar radiation. In contrast to most other natural light-harvesting systems, the chlorosomal antennae are devoid of a protein scaffold to orient the BChl's; thus, they are an attractive goal for mimicry by synthetic chemists, who are able to engineer more robust chromophores to self-assemble. Functional devices with environmentally friendly chromophores-which should be able to act as photosensitizers within hybrid solar cells, leading to high photon-to-current conversion efficiencies even under low illumination conditions-have yet to be fabricated. The orderly manner in which the BChl's and their synthetic counterparts self-assemble imparts strong diamagnetic and optical anisotropies and flow/shear characteristics to their nanostructured assemblies, allowing them to be manipulated by electrical, magnetic, or tribomechanical forces.

AB - Being able to control in time and space the positioning, orientation, movement, and sense of rotation of nano- to microscale objects is currently an active research area in nanoscience, having diverse nanotechnological applications. In this paper, we demonstrate unprecedented control and maneuvering of rod-shaped or tubular nanostructures with high aspect ratios which are formed by self-assembling synthetic porphyrins. The self-assembly algorithm, encoded by appended chemical-recognition groups on the periphery of these porphyrins, is the same as the one operating for chlorosomal bacteriochlorophylls (BChl's). Chlorosomes, rod-shaped organelles with relatively long-range molecular order, are the most efficient naturally occurring light-harvesting systems.(1, 2) They are used by green photosynthetic bacteria to trap visible and infrared light of minute intensities even at great depths, e.g., 100 m below water surface or in volcanic vents in the absence of solar radiation. In contrast to most other natural light-harvesting systems, the chlorosomal antennae are devoid of a protein scaffold to orient the BChl's; thus, they are an attractive goal for mimicry by synthetic chemists, who are able to engineer more robust chromophores to self-assemble. Functional devices with environmentally friendly chromophores-which should be able to act as photosensitizers within hybrid solar cells, leading to high photon-to-current conversion efficiencies even under low illumination conditions-have yet to be fabricated. The orderly manner in which the BChl's and their synthetic counterparts self-assemble imparts strong diamagnetic and optical anisotropies and flow/shear characteristics to their nanostructured assemblies, allowing them to be manipulated by electrical, magnetic, or tribomechanical forces.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84855913123&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84855913123&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/ja203838p

DO - 10.1021/ja203838p

M3 - Article

C2 - 22148684

AN - SCOPUS:84855913123

VL - 134

SP - 944

EP - 954

JO - Journal of the American Chemical Society

JF - Journal of the American Chemical Society

SN - 0002-7863

IS - 2

ER -