Analysis of the effect of neuropeptides and cannabinoids in gastric mucosal defense initiated centrally in the rat.

N. Shujaa, Z. Zádori, A. Rónai, I. Barna, Z. Mergl, M. M. Mozes, K. Gyires

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Abstract

Increasing number of evidence suggest that gastric mucosal protection can be induced also centrally. Several neuropeptides, such as TRH, amylin, adrenomedullin, enkephalin, beta-endorphin, nociceptin, nocistatin, ghrelin or orexin given centrally induce gastroprotection and the dorsal vagal complex and vagal nerve may play prominent role in this centrally initiated effect. Since also cannabinoid receptors are present in the dorsal vagal complex, we aimed to study whether activation of central cannabinoid receptors result in gastric mucosal defense and whether there is an interaction between cannabinoids and endogenous opioids. Gastric mucosal damage was induced by 100% ethanol in rats. The cannabinoids were given intravenously (i.v.) or intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.), while the antagonists were given i.c.v or intracisternally (i.c.). Gastric lesions were evaluated macroscopically 60 min later. Anandamide, methanandamide and WIN55,212-2 reduced ethanol-induced mucosal lesions after both peripheral (0.28-5.6 micromol/kg, 0.7-5.6 micromol/kg and 0.05-0.2 mumol/kg i.v., respectively) and central (2.9-115 nmol/rat, 0.27-70 nmol/rat and 1.9-38 nmol/rat i.c.v., respectively) administration. The gastroprotective effect of anandamide and methanandamide given i.c.v. or i.v.was reversed by the CB(1) receptor antagonist SR141716A (2.16 nmol i.c.v.). Naloxone (27.5 nmol i.c.v.) also antagonized the effect of i.c.v. or i.v. injected anandamide and WIN55,212-2, but less affected that of methanandamide. The gastroprotective effect of anandamide was diminished also by endomorphin-2 antiserum. In conclusion it was first demonstrated that activation of central CB(1) receptors results in gastroprotective effect. The effect is mediated at least partly by endogenous opioids.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-100
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Physiology and Pharmacology
Volume60 Suppl 7
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2009

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Cannabinoids
Neuropeptides
Stomach
Cannabinoid Receptors
rimonabant
Opioid Analgesics
Ethanol
Islet Amyloid Polypeptide
Adrenomedullin
Ghrelin
beta-Endorphin
Enkephalins
Naloxone
Immune Sera
anandamide
methanandamide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{cc68a70fe56a4c96a31104374c810922,
title = "Analysis of the effect of neuropeptides and cannabinoids in gastric mucosal defense initiated centrally in the rat.",
abstract = "Increasing number of evidence suggest that gastric mucosal protection can be induced also centrally. Several neuropeptides, such as TRH, amylin, adrenomedullin, enkephalin, beta-endorphin, nociceptin, nocistatin, ghrelin or orexin given centrally induce gastroprotection and the dorsal vagal complex and vagal nerve may play prominent role in this centrally initiated effect. Since also cannabinoid receptors are present in the dorsal vagal complex, we aimed to study whether activation of central cannabinoid receptors result in gastric mucosal defense and whether there is an interaction between cannabinoids and endogenous opioids. Gastric mucosal damage was induced by 100{\%} ethanol in rats. The cannabinoids were given intravenously (i.v.) or intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.), while the antagonists were given i.c.v or intracisternally (i.c.). Gastric lesions were evaluated macroscopically 60 min later. Anandamide, methanandamide and WIN55,212-2 reduced ethanol-induced mucosal lesions after both peripheral (0.28-5.6 micromol/kg, 0.7-5.6 micromol/kg and 0.05-0.2 mumol/kg i.v., respectively) and central (2.9-115 nmol/rat, 0.27-70 nmol/rat and 1.9-38 nmol/rat i.c.v., respectively) administration. The gastroprotective effect of anandamide and methanandamide given i.c.v. or i.v.was reversed by the CB(1) receptor antagonist SR141716A (2.16 nmol i.c.v.). Naloxone (27.5 nmol i.c.v.) also antagonized the effect of i.c.v. or i.v. injected anandamide and WIN55,212-2, but less affected that of methanandamide. The gastroprotective effect of anandamide was diminished also by endomorphin-2 antiserum. In conclusion it was first demonstrated that activation of central CB(1) receptors results in gastroprotective effect. The effect is mediated at least partly by endogenous opioids.",
author = "N. Shujaa and Z. Z{\'a}dori and A. R{\'o}nai and I. Barna and Z. Mergl and Mozes, {M. M.} and K. Gyires",
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T1 - Analysis of the effect of neuropeptides and cannabinoids in gastric mucosal defense initiated centrally in the rat.

AU - Shujaa, N.

AU - Zádori, Z.

AU - Rónai, A.

AU - Barna, I.

AU - Mergl, Z.

AU - Mozes, M. M.

AU - Gyires, K.

PY - 2009/12

Y1 - 2009/12

N2 - Increasing number of evidence suggest that gastric mucosal protection can be induced also centrally. Several neuropeptides, such as TRH, amylin, adrenomedullin, enkephalin, beta-endorphin, nociceptin, nocistatin, ghrelin or orexin given centrally induce gastroprotection and the dorsal vagal complex and vagal nerve may play prominent role in this centrally initiated effect. Since also cannabinoid receptors are present in the dorsal vagal complex, we aimed to study whether activation of central cannabinoid receptors result in gastric mucosal defense and whether there is an interaction between cannabinoids and endogenous opioids. Gastric mucosal damage was induced by 100% ethanol in rats. The cannabinoids were given intravenously (i.v.) or intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.), while the antagonists were given i.c.v or intracisternally (i.c.). Gastric lesions were evaluated macroscopically 60 min later. Anandamide, methanandamide and WIN55,212-2 reduced ethanol-induced mucosal lesions after both peripheral (0.28-5.6 micromol/kg, 0.7-5.6 micromol/kg and 0.05-0.2 mumol/kg i.v., respectively) and central (2.9-115 nmol/rat, 0.27-70 nmol/rat and 1.9-38 nmol/rat i.c.v., respectively) administration. The gastroprotective effect of anandamide and methanandamide given i.c.v. or i.v.was reversed by the CB(1) receptor antagonist SR141716A (2.16 nmol i.c.v.). Naloxone (27.5 nmol i.c.v.) also antagonized the effect of i.c.v. or i.v. injected anandamide and WIN55,212-2, but less affected that of methanandamide. The gastroprotective effect of anandamide was diminished also by endomorphin-2 antiserum. In conclusion it was first demonstrated that activation of central CB(1) receptors results in gastroprotective effect. The effect is mediated at least partly by endogenous opioids.

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