Analysis of inhomogeneous static magnetic field-induced antinociceptive activity in mice

János F. László, Klára Gyires

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The effect of inhomogeneous static magnetic field (SMF) on visceral pain elicited by the intraperitoneal injection of 0.6% acetic acid (writhing test) was studied in mice in an environment, where animals could freely move. 30 min, whole-body exposure of mice to SMF (permanent NdFeB N50 grade 10 × 10 mm cylindrical magnets with alternating poles) following the nociceptive challenge resulted in a 74% inhibition of the pain reaction (p < 0.001). With the help of several inhomogeneous SMF configurations, where magnets were grouped in partitions and a 2D model of ambulation, motion-induced electric current density, MR-equivalent switching, and slew rate were estimated. Their potential contribution to peripheral nerve stimulation is discussed in correlation to pain inhibition.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProgress in Electromagnetics Research Symposium 2010, PIERS 2010 Xi'an
PublisherElectromagnetics Academy
Pages1156-1162
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)9781617827785
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2010
EventProgress in Electromagnetics Research Symposium 2010, PIERS 2010 Xi'an - Xi'an, China
Duration: Mar 22 2010Mar 26 2010

Publication series

NameProgress in Electromagnetics Research Symposium
Volume2
ISSN (Print)1559-9450

Other

OtherProgress in Electromagnetics Research Symposium 2010, PIERS 2010 Xi'an
CountryChina
CityXi'an
Period3/22/103/26/10

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

Cite this

László, J. F., & Gyires, K. (2010). Analysis of inhomogeneous static magnetic field-induced antinociceptive activity in mice. In Progress in Electromagnetics Research Symposium 2010, PIERS 2010 Xi'an (pp. 1156-1162). (Progress in Electromagnetics Research Symposium; Vol. 2). Electromagnetics Academy.