Analysis of blackbody-like radiation from laser-heated gas-phase tungsten nanoparticles

Lars Landström, P. Heszler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thermal (blackbody-like) radiation that originated from laser-heated tungsten nanoparticles was measured using optical emission spectroscopy. The nanoparticles were generated via ArF excimer laser-assisted photolytic decomposition of WF6/H2/Ar gas mixtures, and the laser heating was applied parallel to the deposition. The temperature of the nanoparticles was determined, and its dependence on time, with respect to the 15-ns laser pulse (full width at half-maximum, fwhm) and laser fluence (φ), has been presented. At φ > 90 mJ/cm2, the particles reached the melting point (shortly after the laser pulse). Dominant cooling mechanisms, such as evaporation (above ∼3000 K) and a combination of heat transfer by the ambient gas and radiative cooling (below ∼3000 K), were observed for the nanoparticles, which were ∼10 nm in diameter. The degree of inelasticity for the (predominantly) argon-gas collisions and the total emissivity of the particles (in the 2500-3000 K temperature region) could also be derived. The measured cooling rate and temperature data indicate that, depending on experimental parameters, evaporation and surface reactions can have a definite effect on the growth of particles.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6216-6221
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry B
Volume108
Issue number20
Publication statusPublished - May 20 2004

Fingerprint

Gas lasers
Tungsten
tungsten
vapor phases
Nanoparticles
Radiation
nanoparticles
radiation
Cooling
cooling
lasers
Laser pulses
Evaporation
Gases
evaporation
gas cooling
Laser heating
Optical emission spectroscopy
Lasers
Argon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Analysis of blackbody-like radiation from laser-heated gas-phase tungsten nanoparticles. / Landström, Lars; Heszler, P.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, Vol. 108, No. 20, 20.05.2004, p. 6216-6221.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2f10a402674e45ed8904e031eb26454e,
title = "Analysis of blackbody-like radiation from laser-heated gas-phase tungsten nanoparticles",
abstract = "Thermal (blackbody-like) radiation that originated from laser-heated tungsten nanoparticles was measured using optical emission spectroscopy. The nanoparticles were generated via ArF excimer laser-assisted photolytic decomposition of WF6/H2/Ar gas mixtures, and the laser heating was applied parallel to the deposition. The temperature of the nanoparticles was determined, and its dependence on time, with respect to the 15-ns laser pulse (full width at half-maximum, fwhm) and laser fluence (φ), has been presented. At φ > 90 mJ/cm2, the particles reached the melting point (shortly after the laser pulse). Dominant cooling mechanisms, such as evaporation (above ∼3000 K) and a combination of heat transfer by the ambient gas and radiative cooling (below ∼3000 K), were observed for the nanoparticles, which were ∼10 nm in diameter. The degree of inelasticity for the (predominantly) argon-gas collisions and the total emissivity of the particles (in the 2500-3000 K temperature region) could also be derived. The measured cooling rate and temperature data indicate that, depending on experimental parameters, evaporation and surface reactions can have a definite effect on the growth of particles.",
author = "Lars Landstr{\"o}m and P. Heszler",
year = "2004",
month = "5",
day = "20",
language = "English",
volume = "108",
pages = "6216--6221",
journal = "Journal of Physical Chemistry B Materials",
issn = "1520-6106",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "20",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Analysis of blackbody-like radiation from laser-heated gas-phase tungsten nanoparticles

AU - Landström, Lars

AU - Heszler, P.

PY - 2004/5/20

Y1 - 2004/5/20

N2 - Thermal (blackbody-like) radiation that originated from laser-heated tungsten nanoparticles was measured using optical emission spectroscopy. The nanoparticles were generated via ArF excimer laser-assisted photolytic decomposition of WF6/H2/Ar gas mixtures, and the laser heating was applied parallel to the deposition. The temperature of the nanoparticles was determined, and its dependence on time, with respect to the 15-ns laser pulse (full width at half-maximum, fwhm) and laser fluence (φ), has been presented. At φ > 90 mJ/cm2, the particles reached the melting point (shortly after the laser pulse). Dominant cooling mechanisms, such as evaporation (above ∼3000 K) and a combination of heat transfer by the ambient gas and radiative cooling (below ∼3000 K), were observed for the nanoparticles, which were ∼10 nm in diameter. The degree of inelasticity for the (predominantly) argon-gas collisions and the total emissivity of the particles (in the 2500-3000 K temperature region) could also be derived. The measured cooling rate and temperature data indicate that, depending on experimental parameters, evaporation and surface reactions can have a definite effect on the growth of particles.

AB - Thermal (blackbody-like) radiation that originated from laser-heated tungsten nanoparticles was measured using optical emission spectroscopy. The nanoparticles were generated via ArF excimer laser-assisted photolytic decomposition of WF6/H2/Ar gas mixtures, and the laser heating was applied parallel to the deposition. The temperature of the nanoparticles was determined, and its dependence on time, with respect to the 15-ns laser pulse (full width at half-maximum, fwhm) and laser fluence (φ), has been presented. At φ > 90 mJ/cm2, the particles reached the melting point (shortly after the laser pulse). Dominant cooling mechanisms, such as evaporation (above ∼3000 K) and a combination of heat transfer by the ambient gas and radiative cooling (below ∼3000 K), were observed for the nanoparticles, which were ∼10 nm in diameter. The degree of inelasticity for the (predominantly) argon-gas collisions and the total emissivity of the particles (in the 2500-3000 K temperature region) could also be derived. The measured cooling rate and temperature data indicate that, depending on experimental parameters, evaporation and surface reactions can have a definite effect on the growth of particles.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=2642520590&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=2642520590&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 18950103

AN - SCOPUS:2642520590

VL - 108

SP - 6216

EP - 6221

JO - Journal of Physical Chemistry B Materials

JF - Journal of Physical Chemistry B Materials

SN - 1520-6106

IS - 20

ER -