An unfairly undervalued participant of the stress processes

The vasopressin

János Varga, D. Zelena

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Our environment can be considered as a set of stressors. Adaptation to them is indispensable to life. However, overloading the hypothalamopituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, one of the major components of adaptation, often leads to stress-related diseases. Therefore understanding the mechanisms of stress processes is highly important. The hypothalamic component of the HPA axis consists of corticotropinreleasing hormone (CRH) and vasopressin, with a questionable contribution of the latter. The natural vasopressin knockout Brattleboro strain is a good tool for the stress-free study of the role of vasopressin in HPA axis regulation. Data from this strain was compared to knockout mice, vasopressin-antiserum and V1b receptor antagonist studies. In adult Brattleboro rats the vasopressin-deficiency did not influence the resting levels as well as the development of chronic stress state. However, the CRH-supporting effect of vasopressin was observable after different acute stress situations, where the exact role depended on the nature of the stressor encountered. In contrast, vasopressin had more crucial role in the regulation of the adrenocorticotropin (ACTH, the hypophyseal level of the HPA axis) secretion during the perinatal age, which was observable during a wide range of relevant physiological stress processes. The dissociation between ACTH and corticosterone secretion (the next, adrenal level of the HPA axis) was surprising. The vasopressin deficiency resulted in higher corticosterone levels than expected based on the low stressor-induced ACTH secretion, therefore an ACTH-independent adrenal gland regulation can be assumed. There was no obvious difference in the HPA axis regulatory role of vasopressin between the two genders. We can conclude that vasopressin plays a more important role in the stress-axis regulation during early development, than we previously thought.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationVasopressin: Mechanisms of Action, Physiology and Side Effects
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages1-28
Number of pages28
ISBN (Print)9781624173110
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Vasopressins
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone
Neurogenic Diabetes Insipidus
Corticosterone
Brattleboro Rats
Hormones
Physiological Phenomena
Vasopressin Receptors
Physiological Stress
Adrenal Glands
Knockout Mice
Immune Sera

Keywords

  • Acute stress
  • Catecholamine
  • Chronic stress
  • Perinatal period
  • Sex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Varga, J., & Zelena, D. (2013). An unfairly undervalued participant of the stress processes: The vasopressin. In Vasopressin: Mechanisms of Action, Physiology and Side Effects (pp. 1-28). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..

An unfairly undervalued participant of the stress processes : The vasopressin. / Varga, János; Zelena, D.

Vasopressin: Mechanisms of Action, Physiology and Side Effects. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2013. p. 1-28.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Varga, J & Zelena, D 2013, An unfairly undervalued participant of the stress processes: The vasopressin. in Vasopressin: Mechanisms of Action, Physiology and Side Effects. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., pp. 1-28.
Varga J, Zelena D. An unfairly undervalued participant of the stress processes: The vasopressin. In Vasopressin: Mechanisms of Action, Physiology and Side Effects. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2013. p. 1-28
Varga, János ; Zelena, D. / An unfairly undervalued participant of the stress processes : The vasopressin. Vasopressin: Mechanisms of Action, Physiology and Side Effects. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2013. pp. 1-28
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