An investigation of the white matter microstructure in motion detection using diffusion MRI

Gergo Csete, Nikoletta Szabó, Alice Rokszin, Eszter Tóth, Gábor Braunitzer, G. Benedek, L. Vécsei, Zsigmond Tamás Kincses

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the most widely investigated functions of the brain is vision. Whereas special attention is often paid to motion detection and its modulation by attention, comparatively still little is known about the structural background of this function. We therefore, examined the white matter microstructural background of coherent motion detection. A random-dot kinematogram paradigm was used to measure the sensitivity of healthy individuals' to movement coherence. The potential correlation was investigated between the motion detection threshold and the white matter microstructure as measured by high angular resolution diffusion MRI. The Track Based Spatial Statistics method was used to address this correlation and probabilistic tractography to reveal the connection between identified regions. A significant positive correlation was found between the behavioural data and the local fractional anisotropy in the posterior part of the right superior frontal gyrus, the right juxta-cortical superior parietal lobule, the left parietal white matter, the left superior temporal gyrus and the left optic radiation. Probabilistic tractography identified pathways that are highly similar to the segregated attention networks, which have a crucial role in the paradigm. This study draws attention to the structural determinant of a behavioural function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-42
Number of pages8
JournalBrain Research
Volume1570
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 27 2014

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Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Parietal Lobe
Anisotropy
Temporal Lobe
Prefrontal Cortex
Radiation
Brain
White Matter

Keywords

  • DTI
  • Motion detection
  • MRI
  • Vision
  • White matter microstructure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

An investigation of the white matter microstructure in motion detection using diffusion MRI. / Csete, Gergo; Szabó, Nikoletta; Rokszin, Alice; Tóth, Eszter; Braunitzer, Gábor; Benedek, G.; Vécsei, L.; Kincses, Zsigmond Tamás.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 1570, 27.06.2014, p. 35-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Csete, Gergo ; Szabó, Nikoletta ; Rokszin, Alice ; Tóth, Eszter ; Braunitzer, Gábor ; Benedek, G. ; Vécsei, L. ; Kincses, Zsigmond Tamás. / An investigation of the white matter microstructure in motion detection using diffusion MRI. In: Brain Research. 2014 ; Vol. 1570. pp. 35-42.
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