An integrated view of protein evolution

C. Pál, B. Papp, Martin J. Lercher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

334 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Why do proteins evolve at different rates? Advances in systems biology and genomics have facilitated a move from studying individual proteins to characterizing global cellular factors. Systematic surveys indicate that protein evolution is not determined exclusively by selection on protein structure and function, but is also affected by the genomic position of the encoding genes, their expression patterns, their position in biological networks and possibly their robustness to mistranslation. Recent work has allowed insights into the relative importance of these factors. We discuss the status of a much-needed coherent view that integrates studies on protein evolution with biochemistry and functional and structural genomics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)337-348
Number of pages12
JournalNature Reviews Genetics
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2006

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genomics
Genomics
Proteins
proteins
protein structure
Systems Biology
biochemistry
Biochemistry
Biological Sciences
gene expression
Gene Expression
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

An integrated view of protein evolution. / Pál, C.; Papp, B.; Lercher, Martin J.

In: Nature Reviews Genetics, Vol. 7, No. 5, 05.2006, p. 337-348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pál, C. ; Papp, B. ; Lercher, Martin J. / An integrated view of protein evolution. In: Nature Reviews Genetics. 2006 ; Vol. 7, No. 5. pp. 337-348.
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