An improved model of severe sepsis in pigs

Daniel Erces, Bettina Zsikai, Lajos Bizanc, Peter Sztanyi, Gergely Vida, M. Borós, Lucian Jiga, Mihai Ionac, Y. Mándi, J. Kaszaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Our aim was to develop a large animal model of sepsis, induced by fecal peritonitis, which reproduces the characteristic macrohemodynamic, microcirculatory and inflammatory changes seen in early human sepsis. Material and methods: Anesthetized minipigs were subjected to fecal peritonitis (n = 9; 0.5 g/kg i.p. autofeces) or sham-operation (i.p. saline, n = 6). Invasive hemodynamic monitoring was started with regular blood gas analyses between the 15-24 hr of the insult. Sublingual microcirculation was characterized by red blood cell velocity (RBCV) changes (with orthogonal polarization spectral imaging), while the intestinal PCO 2 gap was measured by indirect tonometry. The plasma levels of high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB 1) and nitrite/nitrate (NOx) were determined from venous blood samples. Results: The mean arterial pressure gradually decreased below 70 mm Hg in septic animals, while the heart rate and cardiac output increased constantly. In spite of the hyperdynamic reaction the sublingual RBCV decreased, while intestinal PCO 2 gap increased significantly as compared with the control group. The NOx and HMGB 1 plasma concentrations were significantly elevated between 6-16 hr of peritonitis. Conclusion: We report on the introduction of a new animal model fecal peritonitis-induced sepsis. The in vivo data suggest that this experimental model is of clinical relevance and may play useful roles in the development of novel, sepsis-related therapies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-140
Number of pages6
JournalTimisoara Medical Journal
Volume61
Issue number3-4
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Peritonitis
Sepsis
Swine
HMGB1 Protein
Animal Models
Erythrocytes
Miniature Swine
Blood Gas Analysis
Manometry
Microcirculation
Nitrites
Cardiac Output
Nitrates
Arterial Pressure
Theoretical Models
Heart Rate
Hemodynamics
Control Groups
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • High mobility group box protein 1
  • Hyperdynamic circulation
  • Sepsis
  • Sublingual microcirculation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Erces, D., Zsikai, B., Bizanc, L., Sztanyi, P., Vida, G., Borós, M., ... Kaszaki, J. (2011). An improved model of severe sepsis in pigs. Timisoara Medical Journal, 61(3-4), 135-140.

An improved model of severe sepsis in pigs. / Erces, Daniel; Zsikai, Bettina; Bizanc, Lajos; Sztanyi, Peter; Vida, Gergely; Borós, M.; Jiga, Lucian; Ionac, Mihai; Mándi, Y.; Kaszaki, J.

In: Timisoara Medical Journal, Vol. 61, No. 3-4, 2011, p. 135-140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Erces, D, Zsikai, B, Bizanc, L, Sztanyi, P, Vida, G, Borós, M, Jiga, L, Ionac, M, Mándi, Y & Kaszaki, J 2011, 'An improved model of severe sepsis in pigs', Timisoara Medical Journal, vol. 61, no. 3-4, pp. 135-140.
Erces D, Zsikai B, Bizanc L, Sztanyi P, Vida G, Borós M et al. An improved model of severe sepsis in pigs. Timisoara Medical Journal. 2011;61(3-4):135-140.
Erces, Daniel ; Zsikai, Bettina ; Bizanc, Lajos ; Sztanyi, Peter ; Vida, Gergely ; Borós, M. ; Jiga, Lucian ; Ionac, Mihai ; Mándi, Y. ; Kaszaki, J. / An improved model of severe sepsis in pigs. In: Timisoara Medical Journal. 2011 ; Vol. 61, No. 3-4. pp. 135-140.
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