Alternative views of tissue stem cell plasticity

Virág Vas, Melinda Hajdu, K. Pálóczi, F. Uher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Stem cells have traditionally been characterized as either embryonic (pluripotent) or tissue-specific (multipotent). Thus, tissue-specific stem cells generate the cell types comprising a particular tissue in embryos and, in some cases, adults. A recent series of studies, however, has challenged the notion of lineage restriction in multipotent stem cells. These experiments have been interpreted as evidence that stem cells from one tissue can be induced to differentiate into cells of other organs, either in vitro or after transplantation in vivo. This paper reviews the current evidence for stem cell plasticity. Some of the potential caveats to the current work are also discussed and, finally, the potential underlying mechanisms of stem cell plasticity are examined.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-190
Number of pages16
JournalHaematologia
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Stem Cells
Multipotent Stem Cells
Embryonic Structures
Transplantation
Cell Plasticity

Keywords

  • Dedifferentiation
  • Plasticity
  • Pluripotent stem cells
  • Stem cell niche
  • Tissue stem cells
  • Transdifferentiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Alternative views of tissue stem cell plasticity. / Vas, Virág; Hajdu, Melinda; Pálóczi, K.; Uher, F.

In: Haematologia, Vol. 32, No. 3, 2002, p. 175-190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vas, Virág ; Hajdu, Melinda ; Pálóczi, K. ; Uher, F. / Alternative views of tissue stem cell plasticity. In: Haematologia. 2002 ; Vol. 32, No. 3. pp. 175-190.
@article{8cd459b89feb485381b4502c3528099e,
title = "Alternative views of tissue stem cell plasticity",
abstract = "Stem cells have traditionally been characterized as either embryonic (pluripotent) or tissue-specific (multipotent). Thus, tissue-specific stem cells generate the cell types comprising a particular tissue in embryos and, in some cases, adults. A recent series of studies, however, has challenged the notion of lineage restriction in multipotent stem cells. These experiments have been interpreted as evidence that stem cells from one tissue can be induced to differentiate into cells of other organs, either in vitro or after transplantation in vivo. This paper reviews the current evidence for stem cell plasticity. Some of the potential caveats to the current work are also discussed and, finally, the potential underlying mechanisms of stem cell plasticity are examined.",
keywords = "Dedifferentiation, Plasticity, Pluripotent stem cells, Stem cell niche, Tissue stem cells, Transdifferentiation",
author = "Vir{\'a}g Vas and Melinda Hajdu and K. P{\'a}l{\'o}czi and F. Uher",
year = "2002",
doi = "10.1163/15685590260461002",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "175--190",
journal = "Haematologia",
issn = "0017-6559",
publisher = "VSP BV",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Alternative views of tissue stem cell plasticity

AU - Vas, Virág

AU - Hajdu, Melinda

AU - Pálóczi, K.

AU - Uher, F.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Stem cells have traditionally been characterized as either embryonic (pluripotent) or tissue-specific (multipotent). Thus, tissue-specific stem cells generate the cell types comprising a particular tissue in embryos and, in some cases, adults. A recent series of studies, however, has challenged the notion of lineage restriction in multipotent stem cells. These experiments have been interpreted as evidence that stem cells from one tissue can be induced to differentiate into cells of other organs, either in vitro or after transplantation in vivo. This paper reviews the current evidence for stem cell plasticity. Some of the potential caveats to the current work are also discussed and, finally, the potential underlying mechanisms of stem cell plasticity are examined.

AB - Stem cells have traditionally been characterized as either embryonic (pluripotent) or tissue-specific (multipotent). Thus, tissue-specific stem cells generate the cell types comprising a particular tissue in embryos and, in some cases, adults. A recent series of studies, however, has challenged the notion of lineage restriction in multipotent stem cells. These experiments have been interpreted as evidence that stem cells from one tissue can be induced to differentiate into cells of other organs, either in vitro or after transplantation in vivo. This paper reviews the current evidence for stem cell plasticity. Some of the potential caveats to the current work are also discussed and, finally, the potential underlying mechanisms of stem cell plasticity are examined.

KW - Dedifferentiation

KW - Plasticity

KW - Pluripotent stem cells

KW - Stem cell niche

KW - Tissue stem cells

KW - Transdifferentiation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036960474&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036960474&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1163/15685590260461002

DO - 10.1163/15685590260461002

M3 - Article

C2 - 12611479

AN - SCOPUS:0036960474

VL - 32

SP - 175

EP - 190

JO - Haematologia

JF - Haematologia

SN - 0017-6559

IS - 3

ER -