Alterations in the sugar metabolism and in the vacuolar system of mesophyll cells contribute to the desiccation tolerance of Haberlea rhodopensis ecotypes

K. Georgieva, F. Rapparini, G. Bertazza, G. Mihailova, E. Sárvári, Solti, Keresztes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Haberlea rhodopensis belongs to the small group of resurrection plants having the unique ability to survive desiccation to air dry state retaining most of its chlorophyll content and then resume normal function upon rehydration. It prefers the shady valleys and northward facing slopes of limestone ridges in mountain zones with high average humidity. Nevertheless, it can be found rarely on rocks directly exposed to the sunlight, without the coverage of the canopy. In the present study, we follow the alterations in the subcellular organization of mesophyll cells and sugar metabolism upon desiccation of shade and sun H. rhodopensis plants. Composition and content of soluble carbohydrates during desiccation and rehydration were different in plants grown below the trees or on the sunny rocks. Sucrose, however, was dominating in both ecotypes. The amount of starch grains in chloroplasts was inversely related to that of sugars. Concomitantly with these changes, the number of vacuoles was multiplied in the cells. This can be explained by the development of small (secondary) vacuoles peripherally in the cytoplasm, rather than by the fragmentation of the single vacuole, proposed earlier in the literature. Accordingly, the centripetal movement of chloroplasts and other organelles may be a result of the dynamic changes in the vacuolar system. Upon rehydration, the inner vacuoles enlarged and the organelles returned to their normal position.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalProtoplasma
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Dec 23 2015

Fingerprint

Mesophyll Cells
Ecotype
Desiccation
Vacuoles
ecotypes
mesophyll
vacuoles
Fluid Therapy
rehydration
sugars
metabolism
Chloroplasts
Organelles
organelles
Craterostigma
chloroplasts
rocks
cells
Calcium Carbonate
Sunlight

Keywords

  • Desiccation tolerance
  • Resurrection plants
  • Soluble sugars
  • Vacuole formation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Alterations in the sugar metabolism and in the vacuolar system of mesophyll cells contribute to the desiccation tolerance of Haberlea rhodopensis ecotypes. / Georgieva, K.; Rapparini, F.; Bertazza, G.; Mihailova, G.; Sárvári, E.; Solti; Keresztes.

In: Protoplasma, 23.12.2015, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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