Alterations in EEG activity and sleep after influenza viral infection in GHRH receptor-deficient mice

Jeremy A. Alt, Ferenc Obal, T. R. Traynor, J. Gardi, Jeannine A. Majde, James M. Krueger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Viral infections induce excess non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) in mice. Growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (GHRH receptor) was previously identified as a candidate gene responsible for NREMS responses to influenza challenge in mice. The dwarf lit/lit mouse with a nonfunctional GHRH receptor was used to assess the role of the GHRH receptor in viral-induced NREMS. After influenza A virus infection the duration and intensity [electroencephalogram (EEG) delta power] of NREMS increased in heterozygous mice with the normal phenotype, whereas NREMS and EEG delta power decreased in homozygous lit/lit mice. Lit/lit mice developed a pathological state with EEG slow waves and enhanced muscle tone. Other influenza-induced responses (decreases in rapid eye movement sleep, changes in the EEG high-frequency bands during the various stages of vigilance, hypothermia, and decreased motor activity) did not differ between the heterozygous and lit/lit mice. GH replacement failed to normalize the NREMS responses in the lit/lit mice after influenza inoculation. Decreases in NREMS paralleled hypothermia in the lit/lit mice. Lung virus levels were similar in the two mouse strains. Lit/lit mice had a higher death rate after influenza challenge than the heterozygotes. In conclusion, GHRH signaling is involved in the NREMS response to influenza infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)460-468
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume95
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2003

Fingerprint

Virus Diseases
Human Influenza
Electroencephalography
Sleep
Eye Movements
Hypothermia
somatotropin releasing hormone receptor
Influenza A virus
REM Sleep
Heterozygote
Motor Activity
Viruses
Phenotype
Muscles
Lung

Keywords

  • Electroencephalogram
  • Fever
  • Growth hormone
  • Growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor
  • Lit/lit mice
  • Non-rapid eye movement sleep
  • Rapid eye movement sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Alt, J. A., Obal, F., Traynor, T. R., Gardi, J., Majde, J. A., & Krueger, J. M. (2003). Alterations in EEG activity and sleep after influenza viral infection in GHRH receptor-deficient mice. Journal of Applied Physiology, 95(2), 460-468.

Alterations in EEG activity and sleep after influenza viral infection in GHRH receptor-deficient mice. / Alt, Jeremy A.; Obal, Ferenc; Traynor, T. R.; Gardi, J.; Majde, Jeannine A.; Krueger, James M.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 95, No. 2, 01.08.2003, p. 460-468.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alt, JA, Obal, F, Traynor, TR, Gardi, J, Majde, JA & Krueger, JM 2003, 'Alterations in EEG activity and sleep after influenza viral infection in GHRH receptor-deficient mice', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 95, no. 2, pp. 460-468.
Alt, Jeremy A. ; Obal, Ferenc ; Traynor, T. R. ; Gardi, J. ; Majde, Jeannine A. ; Krueger, James M. / Alterations in EEG activity and sleep after influenza viral infection in GHRH receptor-deficient mice. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2003 ; Vol. 95, No. 2. pp. 460-468.
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