Allo-network drugs: Extension of the allosteric drug concept to protein- protein interaction and signaling networks

András Szilágyi, Ruth Nussinov, P. Csermely

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Allosteric drugs are usually more specific and have fewer side effects than orthosteric drugs targeting the same protein. Here, we overview the current knowledge on allosteric signal transmission from the network point of view, and show that most intra-protein conformational changes may be dynamically transmitted across protein-protein interaction and signaling networks of the cell. Allo-network drugs influence the pharmacological target protein indirectly using specific inter-protein network pathways. We show that allo-network drugs may have a higher efficiency to change the networks of human cells than those of other organisms, and can be designed to have specific effects on cells in a diseased state. Finally, we summarize possible methods to identify allo-network drug targets and sites, which may develop to a promising new area of systems-based drug design.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-77
Number of pages14
JournalCurrent Topics in Medicinal Chemistry
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Protein Interaction Maps
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Proteins
Drug Design
Drug Delivery Systems
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Pharmacology

Keywords

  • Allo-network drugs
  • Allosteric drugs
  • Interactome
  • Protein structure networks
  • Protein-protein interaction networks
  • Signaling networks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Drug Discovery

Cite this

Allo-network drugs : Extension of the allosteric drug concept to protein- protein interaction and signaling networks. / Szilágyi, András; Nussinov, Ruth; Csermely, P.

In: Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry, Vol. 13, No. 1, 2013, p. 64-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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