Alifedrine, a positive inotropic agent that moderately reduces the severity of ischaemia and reperfusion-induced ventricular arrhythmias

Cherry L. Wainwright, James R. Parratt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of alifedrine, a positive inotropic agent, were examined in greyhounds anaesthetised with chloralose. An intravenous dose of 0.3 mg kg-1 resulted in a substantial increase in myocardial contractility (increased dP/dtmax, cardiac output and stroke volume) without significantly affecting heart rate. The effects of alifedrine on the severity of arrhythmias resulting from both coronary artery occlusion and reperfusion were also determined. A mild anti-arrhythmic effect was observed during early ischaemia when the incidence of ventricular tachycardia was reduced from 90% in controls to 50% in treated dogs. There was also a significant reduction in the number of extrasystoles appearing as ventricular tachycardia (from 511 ± 138 to 151 ± 84). The total number of extrasystoles during the first 30 min of ischaemia was also reduced, although not significantly, from 846 ± 193 to 527 ± 86. Following release of a 40 min coronary artery occlusion there was a marked reduction in reperfusion-induced ventricular fibrillation from 75% in controls, to 37% in the alifedrine-treated dogs. The overall survival from the combined occlusion-reperfusion insult was increased from 20% in controls to 50%. These results suggest that alifedrine has an unusual and useful spectrum of pharmacological activity in that it combines antiarrhythmic activity with an ability to improve cardiac function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)373-380
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Pharmacology
Volume147
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 15 1988

Keywords

  • Alifedrine
  • Arrhythmias
  • Ischaemia
  • Reperfusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

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