Alcoholic Hepatitis: A Review

Nooshin Hosseini, Julia Shor, G. Szabó

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) represents a spectrum of injury, ranging from simple steatosis to alcoholic hepatitis to cirrhosis. Regular alcohol use results in fatty changes in the liver which can develop into inflammation, fibrosis and ultimately cirrhosis with continued, excessive drinking. Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is an acute hepatic inflammation associated with significant morbidity and mortality that can occur in patients with steatosis or underlying cirrhosis. The pathogenesis of ALD is multifactorial and in addition to genetic factors, alcohol-induced hepatocyte damage, reactive oxygen species, gut-derived microbial components result in steatosis and inflammatory cell (macrophage and neutrophil leukocyte) recruitment and activation in the liver. Continued alcohol and pro-inflammatory cytokines induce stellate cell activation and result in progressive fibrosis. Other than cessation of alcohol use, medical therapy of AH is limited to prednisolone in a subset of patients. Given the high mortality of AH and the progressive nature of ALD, there is a major need for new therapeutic intervention for this underserved patient population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)408-416
Number of pages9
JournalAlcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire)
Volume54
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2019

Fingerprint

Alcoholic Hepatitis
Liver
Fibrosis
Alcoholic Liver Diseases
Alcohols
Vulnerable Populations
Chemical activation
Inflammation
Neutrophil Activation
Neutrophil Infiltration
Mortality
Macrophages
Prednisolone
Drinking
Hepatocytes
Reactive Oxygen Species
Leukocytes
Cytokines
Morbidity
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • ABIC score
  • alcoholic hepatitis
  • alcoholic liver disease
  • alcoholic steatohepatitis
  • glascow alcoholic hepatitis score
  • lille score
  • maddrey score
  • MELD score
  • pro-inflammatory cytokines
  • stellate cell activation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Alcoholic Hepatitis : A Review. / Hosseini, Nooshin; Shor, Julia; Szabó, G.

In: Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire), Vol. 54, No. 4, 01.07.2019, p. 408-416.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hosseini, Nooshin ; Shor, Julia ; Szabó, G. / Alcoholic Hepatitis : A Review. In: Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire). 2019 ; Vol. 54, No. 4. pp. 408-416.
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