Aging and Change in Location of Hepatic Lysosomal Enzymes

Shoetsu Tamakuma, Masaru Ishiyama, Sumihiko Koizumi, Tatsuya Takano, S. Goto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

de Duve and his collaborators have presented the evidence that a number of previously-inactive enzymes become activated probably due to release from the intracellular particles called “lysosome”. Thereafter, attention has been made to the apparent corelation between the disruption or increased permeability of lysosomal membrane and several pathological states such as metabolic disorders, refractory shock, or aging, The purpose of this communication is to describe whether ther is any cogent relationship between lysosomal enzyme activity and aging process of liver in human beings or some animals, or not. Quickly-excised liver samples of mouse, hamster, or guinea-pig were homogenized with a Tefron glass homogenizer in cold 0.25 M. sucrose csolution containing 0.01 M. tris buffer (pH 7.5). The acid RNase activity of both supernatant (S) and precipitate (P) fractions obtained by 27,000 G centrifugation were measured. The liver tissue samples were also obtained from twenty-three surgical patients who were operated for uncomplicated gastro-duodenal or gall bladder diseases. The age distribution of these patients were from 26 to 85 years old, and no patients showed any abnormal liver function preoperatively. The acid RNase and beta-glucuronidase activities of human liver samples were also measured by almost the same procedures with animal experiment. The change in the location of lysosomal enzymes was shown by changes in ratio of activity of (S) to (P) fraction (S : P Ratio). As a result, the remarkable increase of acid RNase activity in supernatant fraction compared to that in the particulate fraction of liver, was recognized in mouse, hamster, and human being with advancing age, whereas the change of total activity of the enzyme was almost negligible. S : P ratio of both beta-glucuronidase in human liver and acid RNase in guinea-pig did not show any cogent increase with aging. The foregoing results were discussed with special reference to our previous communication presenting that the RNA contents in human liver decrese with aging.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)400-406
Number of pages7
JournalNippon Ronen Igakkai Zasshi. Japanese Journal of Geriatrics
Volume6
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1969

Fingerprint

Liver
Enzymes
Ribonucleases
Acids
Glucuronidase
Cricetinae
Guinea Pigs
Gallbladder Diseases
Tromethamine
Age Distribution
Lysosomes
Centrifugation
Human Activities
Glass
Sucrose
Shock
Permeability
Communication
RNA
Membranes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Aging and Change in Location of Hepatic Lysosomal Enzymes. / Tamakuma, Shoetsu; Ishiyama, Masaru; Koizumi, Sumihiko; Takano, Tatsuya; Goto, S.

In: Nippon Ronen Igakkai Zasshi. Japanese Journal of Geriatrics, Vol. 6, No. 6, 1969, p. 400-406.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tamakuma, Shoetsu ; Ishiyama, Masaru ; Koizumi, Sumihiko ; Takano, Tatsuya ; Goto, S. / Aging and Change in Location of Hepatic Lysosomal Enzymes. In: Nippon Ronen Igakkai Zasshi. Japanese Journal of Geriatrics. 1969 ; Vol. 6, No. 6. pp. 400-406.
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